Co.Design

Clever Crosswalk Squashes Jaywalking, by Making it Legal

Eat your heart out, coppers!

Jaywalking: Everyone does it, so you might as well legalize it. But is there any way to make it less dangerous?

Design to the rescue! Korean designer Jae Min Lim has the clever idea to turn crosswalks into, well, ?J's. By curving the typical Zebra crossing to take up a wider swath of road, you carve out a nice, safe path for pedestrians — one that reflects how they actually walk.

And you'd barely affect gridlock. Sure, cars would have to stop a bit further away from the traffic light. But ostensibly, you'd also have fewer car-on-pedestrian accidents, which can turn a daily commute into something like this.

Lim's concept was shortlisted in the Design for All competition sponsored by Designboom and the Seoul Design Fair. He calls it the Ergo Crosswalk (short for ergonomic), and for added safety, he envisions LED Zebra stripes that tell pedestrians when to cross by glowing red or green. We're not sure about that. It could confuse cars into thinking they've got a greenlight when they don't. But we're all for jaywalking. Sanctioned jaywalking, that is.

[Via Designboom]

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2 Comments

  • KevinDryfuse

    I would assume that the reason pedestrians "curve" the crosswalk is to get as close to the crosswalk without deviating too far from it ... so they don't feel like they are jaywalking. Once you place a large curve for them to legally cut the corners you'll probably see those that could cut the corners now cutting a straight line through the curved area. Basically what I see is that people like to "cheat" the current system and creating a new layout will only change how people are "cheating" the system.

    Honestly, by looking at the graphic to the left and the associated photographs, it seems the solution is wider crosswalks ... or at least crosswalks that extend all the way to the stop lines. Based on where the stop lines are for traffic (see photo 1, 3, 5, and 9), people actually using those lines to determine where they can safely begin their crossing.

    Maybe I'm missing something. It's a original concept, and I'd be curious to see multiple styles and patterns tested. Human behavior is a complicated monster.

  • frederik rostrup

    So Feng Shui. Adapt systems to actual human behaviour - not the other way round. More.More!