Infographic Of The Day: Where Do Foreigners Seek The American Dream?

When foreigners dream about the U.S., do they see playgrounds of infinite pleasure or epicenters of economic opportunity?

America, at its best, is a glittering symbol of promise to would-be immigrants. But where do they actually want to live in the United States?

Trulia, the real-estate listings site, has come up with the only data set we've seen that actually breaks that question down to the city level. Their infographic, Global Pursuits of the American Dream, was built using incoming real-estate searches on Trulia's website. These were then broken down by country of origin, and the city being searched. Here's what the data looks like for two relatively wealth countries, Germany and Italy:

Germany

[San Antonio is an odd inclusion, until you realize that America has a strong military presence in Germany and San Antonio has a number of military bases. Perhaps this has to do with Germany-stationed soldiers looking to return home.]

Italy

Keep in mind that these searches are for real-estate listings, not tourist destinations. So they really do reflect something about the ideal cities that foreigners would like to live in. You'll note that the two them are very similar -- meaning, you'd think, that the American dream is really synonymous with a couple U.S. cities, which each represent a different ideal, whether it's bikinis and beaches (Miami), bleached blonds (L.A.), or fast-talking culture vultures (NYC).

But then, look again: Here's what the searches look like for China and India, two countries that are relatively poor:

China

India

This time, the most-searched cities are places of great industry, rather than just limitless pleasures. (How else to explain Chicago?! And who knew that Brooklyn would be so popular in India?) The picture you get is one of ambitious immigrants from China and India, looking for places with a great demand for highly skilled workers. Those from richer countries such as Germany or Italy are more likely looking for second homes in places that seem fun to live.

Which is sort of fascinating: As the data shows, the American dream means different things abroad, depending on how much money you have.

[Check out the interactive chart here]

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5 Comments

  • Foreigner

    For a great book to help foreigners in the U.S. that is endorsed worldwide by ambassadors, teachers and scholars: What Foreigners Need To Know About America From A To Z: How to understand crazy American culture, people, government, business, language and more. It discusses the American Dream and compares it with the Europen Dream and the fundamental differences.

  • ESL Tutor

    I've read this book cover to cover. I'm not a foreigner--except back about 10 generations maybe. But I do teach English and a Second Language and tutor. When I do that, I teach more than accent reduction and grammar. I teach culture. This book will be invaluable to teachers everywhere. I can't think anything the author missed. I can find something on almost any subject--like a recommended movie or book (or a list of them) when I talk about American culture.
     

  • Breanna Scothorn

    Hello Cliff Kuang, I am currently doing an essay on "The American Dream - Reality or Illusion" and I have to do some interviews.  I have some questions that I have listed below for the interview.  I would appreciate it if you would complete it.  Thank you.  

    Breanna 

    How
    would you define the American dream?                                                           

     

    What
    is it to you personally?                                                                                               

     

    In
    what ways are you trying to achieve this American dream?                                   

     

    How
    has it been difficult for you to achieve the American dream?                                   

     

    In
    what ways does our system (political/economic/educational) help make the
    American dream easy to achieve?                                                                                               

    How do
    you think your background has helped or hindered you achieving the
    American dream? (Possibly two examples)                                                                       

     

    Do you
    have any other comments you would like to add about this subject?                       

  • Eric M

    "How else to explain Chicago?!"

    Fuck you, you pretentious coastal bigot.  That's how.