Co.Design

Genius Marketing: Artsy Animated GIFs Show Beer-Making Process

Dogfish Head teamed up with "cinemagraph"-makers Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg to document the process of creating their new gluten-free brew.

You all went gaga when we featured the animated-GIF stylings of Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg earlier this year, so we're pleased to see that the duo is expanding their horizons with a new project. Yes, it's marketing beer. And yes, it's still pretty freaking cool.

Beck and Burg used their "cinemagraph" technique to document the process of making Dogfish Head's new strawberry-and-honey-flavored Tweason'ale in a series of what they describe as "journalistic" visual vignettes.

[The process of selecting then pressing the strawberries for juice, to be added to the brew]

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Let's call a spade a spade: This is marketing, pure and simple. But a crass "Whassup" ad this certainly ain't: instead, Burg and Beck capture the creative "process value" behind Dogfish's product, showing how luscious organic strawberries are hand-loaded into a wooden fruit press, sorghum is hand-poured into the brew kettle, and the first pint is lovingly served. The cinemagraphs are subtle and lovingly crafted -- just like (get it?) the beer itself. A marketing match made in heaven.

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[Adding the sorghum and the strawberry]

It's worth noting that Burg and Beck contacted Dogfish to collaborate, rather than the other way around. That detail makes the project feel, if not literally "journalistic," at least appealingly authentic from a creative standpoint. And if it helps Dogfish sell more Tweason'ale -- hey, that's just a bonus.

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[And voila, the final product]

I have to admit, the brew sounds pretty tasty. And without seeing these gorgeous animated GIFs showing the process behind it, I probably never would have known about it. If this is the future of marketing, maybe we should all raise a pint.

[Read our previous story about the founder of Dogfish Head, Sam Calagione]

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17 Comments

  • Mike McGarry

    Dogfish makes a great product and these animated GIFs make things come alive without incorporating video. This would be a great addition to any Facebook custom product tab, f-commerce.  Thanks for sharing!

  • Mike McGarry

    Dogfish makes a great product and these animated GIFs make things come alive without incorporating video. This would be a great addition to any Facebook custom product tab, f-commerce.  

  • Joseph Lawton

    Interesting and I'm sure very time consuming. The one's with the people are a little weird, kind of creepy - especially with the eye movement. Maybe it's the subject matter (with the beer) - but this kind of reminds me of those cheesy electronic wall art pieces with the flowing waterfalls or  beer. You know something you'd find in a basement rec room from the 70's.

  • Lisabeth Rosenberg

    Very Nice.  Visually appealing, looks delicious and I don't even like beer.

  • Dana Lee

    It's stills, fast, continuous shots and animated slideshow. It's an awesome method for documenting without video camera.

  • Dean Eller

    OMG! Amazing, I'd like to dissect one to see how it was done. Was it stills or video/movie frame capture? In any case it's awesome. Nice effect.

  • Mac Morgan

    Tempting and a lot more labor create than we realize. Kind of has a Magic Kingdom "Hall of Presidents" vibe going on.

  • John Torres

    This literally has it all.  Moving pictures, cool marketing, and beer!  The moving images are what really separates this article from others and I think it works well with their product.  Other products may not appeal to the senses like this one however the technique can still be used to maximize the marketing effects.  

  • Ben Simerly

    These have got to be the coolest pictures ever created, and then oh ya, there of BEER!!!  Hence officially making them the coolest pictures ever created. 

  • Bernard Farrell

    Those are captivating images, I can see this becoming a big trend, live the way Ken Burns uses pictures in documentaries. That's fairly ubiquitous these days.

    The general approach reminds me of the moving pictures in the Harry Potter books, thanks for pointing these out. Now I want software so I can do the same thing myself!