Wanted: A Fishbowl That Doubles As Glass Sculpture

Aruliden blends function and form to create a modern update of the common fishbowl.

If there’s one accessory that looks horribly out of a place in a minimalist home, it’s a fish tank decked out with plastic accessories. Which is kind of a shame, since a fish is one of the few pets that won’t wreck the Mies van der Rohe daybed. The designers at New York–based Aruliden have reinvented the lowly fishbowl, transforming it into a hand-blown glass sculpture almost worthy of display in the Farnsworth House.

Aruliden’s Fishscape, produced by Gaia & Gino, replaces the standard fake habitat with a textured landscape that rises from the tank floor like a glacier. “We often like to look at how we can create new icons for some very familiar items in our everyday lives--objects that have focused too much on their function and not enough on their form,” Aruliden’s Johan Liden tells Co.Design. “The classic fishbowl served its purpose in its form but was not very desirable on its own.”

Just as modern toys are geared more toward design-minded parents than their fun-loving children, this bowl probably pleases humans more than their aquatic pets. After all, the point of those faux habitats is to give fish a place to hide, and we doubt that residents will appreciate the quality of hand-blown glass. Also, bear in mind that attaching a filter to aerate the water might destroy the aesthetic.

Still, Aruliden’s effort may boost the popularity of fish among the high-design contingent: “We wanted to create a fishbowl that would actually make you want to go out and get a fish,” Liden says.

The bowl retails for $140 at the Conran Shop and Unica Home.

[Photo by Dustin Ross]

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3 Comments

  • Amit S Bapat

    My only concern here is that it may look aesthetically pleasing, but it may be worse than a regular fish bowl for the fish. The reason is the reduction in water. A fish bowl has already less water than what is required to keep a fish healthy. Without the lack of filters and circulation,  a fish bowl is an in-humane place to keep fish. If you go ahead, and reduce that little amount water to fit a sculpture, then you are making a death grave for the fish. Being a designer and a fish keeper, I strongly feel that certain products require form to follow function. ANd this is one of them.