Sofa by Nike Karlsson, $899

“Many modern sofas feel heavy and clumsy," says designer Nike Karlsson. "The inspiration for IKEA PS 2012 sofa came instead from old tubular steel sofas that are light and airy. At the same time, design is more and more concerned with the environment. Many sofas today contain materials that cannot be recycled. That’s why we tested different solutions and chose pocket springs. Pocket springs are used in mattresses and are pockets with small springs in them. Metal springs aren’t just easier to recycle, lots of springs also means a lot of comfort.”

Pendant lamp by Henrik Preutz, $99.99

“My inspiration for IKEA PS 2012 pendant lamp came from both classic pendant lamps and from modern LED technology," says Henrik Preutz. "With LED technology, light diodes can be built into the shade itself, which reflects the light and makes it less harsh.”

Pictures by Anna Efverlund, $39–$99

“In the ’70s you could buy signed reproductions of Lars Norrman’s paintings at IKEA," Anna Efverlund says. "He often painted working women in a colorful, naive style. I like his way of depicting everyday life and found my own subjects during a business trip to southern India. When I travelled around to visit our factories I took a lot of pictures of working people. IKEA PS 2012 pictures tell a story about how we work, but also about the big, colorful world around us.”

TV bench by Lisa Widén and Anna Wallin Irinarchos, $179

“IKEA PS 2012 TV bench for modern high technology was inspired by old furniture with drapery," the designers say. "We gave the doors a wavy look and you can even choose doors in bright yellow. A TV bench like this one really makes traditional media storage feel pale and colorless."

High-back armchair by Ebba Strandmark, $89

"We raised the backrest and added two armrests, Ebba Strandmark says. "Now it’s easier to sit down and stand up, and you can lean back comfortably and spend hour after hour in the company of good friends.”

Armchair by Marcus Arvonen, $59.99

“Imagine two classic IKEA chairs, one in wood and one in plastic," Marcus Arvonen says. "What happens if you combine the two? The result is a new product in wood plastic composite, a material that brings out the best in both materials. The excellent design qualities of plastic come through and the wood composite means reduced carbon dioxide emissions when we manufacture the IKEA PS 2012 armchair.”

Dining table by Jon Karlsson, $179

”Functional furniture in hardwood, like teak, was modern in the 1950s," Jon Karlsson says. "I wanted to find a design that was related to the style of the ’50s, but use materials that are much better for the environment. Bamboo is a material that grows quickly, and when it’s layer-glued it becomes extremely hard and durable. Plus, it resembles teak.”

Side tables by Henrik Preutz, $29–$49 

“The new IKEA PS side tables are inspired by the flower stands that were popular years ago, but are designed for all of us who can’t make up our minds," Henrik Preutz says. "That’s why the side tables come in three different versions, with three different table tops-- all with a bamboo frame. You choose whether you want a table with a flat surface, with a big fruit bowl or with four bowls--bowls that you can use for anything from flowers to snacks. If you have a hard time choosing, you can easily combine all the tables together to make one large sideboard.”

Chest of drawers by Ehlén Johansson, $399

“Old IKEA catalogs are full of beautiful pine furniture. and they made me want to design something modern using pine,"Ehlén Johansson says. "The result is a piece of furniture which I think brings out the best in pine. The drawers are painted red inside and create an attractive contrast to the exterior with the visible wood grains that give the wood a natural pattern. IKEA PS 2012 chest of drawers is produced with fast-growing pine, which makes it possible for us to produce more material in less time and save sensitive forests at the same time.”

Rugs by Maria Vinka, $49–$149

“IKEA PS 2012 rugs are the result of collaboration," says Maria Vinka. "It started with a visit to a rug fair, where I spoke with different producers. Thanks to those contacts, I was able to adapt my design early to the factory’s capabilities, which saved both time and work. I love bright colors and dots and that became the foundation for my design. On one of the rugs the dots are cut out and on the other rug the dots are in raised relief, so the pile itself becomes a decorative element in the design.”

Rugs by Maria Vinka, $49–$149

“IKEA PS 2012 rugs are the result of collaboration," says Maria Vinka. "It started with a visit to a rug fair, where I spoke with different producers. Thanks to those contacts, I was able to adapt my design early to the factory’s capabilities, which saved both time and work. I love bright colors and dots and that became the foundation for my design. On one of the rugs the dots are cut out and on the other rug the dots are in raised relief, so the pile itself becomes a decorative element in the design.”

Plant stand by Nicolas Cortolezzis, $39.99
“I wanted to create a kitchen garden for everyone with gardening dreams--even for people who live in small spaces or in the middle of a big city," Nicolas Cortolezzis says. "My mobile garden lets you grow things indoors, vertically. Three plant pots give you room for both
beautiful flowers and nutritious herbs, and you get lots of wonderful scents into the bargain. IKEA PS
2012 plant stand is tall, but surprisingly light and made with a minimal amount of material. You can move it from place to place easily and, if you want, you can even use it as a green room divider.”

Plant stand by Nicolas Cortolezzis, $39.99
“I wanted to create a kitchen garden for everyone with gardening dreams--even for people who live in small spaces or in the middle of a big city," Nicolas Cortolezzis says. "My mobile garden lets you grow things indoors, vertically. Three plant pots give you room for both
beautiful flowers and nutritious herbs, and you get lots of wonderful scents into the bargain. IKEA PS
2012 plant stand is tall, but surprisingly light and made with a minimal amount of material. You can move it from place to place easily and, if you want, you can even use it as a green room divider.”

Plant stand by Nicolas Cortolezzis, $39.99
“I wanted to create a kitchen garden for everyone with gardening dreams--even for people who live in small spaces or in the middle of a big city," Nicolas Cortolezzis says. "My mobile garden lets you grow things indoors, vertically. Three plant pots give you room for both
beautiful flowers and nutritious herbs, and you get lots of wonderful scents into the bargain. IKEA PS
2012 plant stand is tall, but surprisingly light and made with a minimal amount of material. You can move it from place to place easily and, if you want, you can even use it as a green room divider.”

Plant stand by Nicolas Cortolezzis, $39.99
“I wanted to create a kitchen garden for everyone with gardening dreams--even for people who live in small spaces or in the middle of a big city," Nicolas Cortolezzis says. "My mobile garden lets you grow things indoors, vertically. Three plant pots give you room for both
beautiful flowers and nutritious herbs, and you get lots of wonderful scents into the bargain. IKEA PS
2012 plant stand is tall, but surprisingly light and made with a minimal amount of material. You can move it from place to place easily and, if you want, you can even use it as a green room divider.”

Ikea's Chic New PS Collection Revisits The Company's 60-Year History

Ikea to its designers: Make our old stuff better.

Furniture designers don’t often get the chance to correct their mistakes: Their products are on the market for a couple of years and, with few awesomely popular exceptions, eventually get dropped from their manufacturers’ catalogs to make room for new stock. But Ikea, the go-to big box for affordable Scandinavian design, has given its designers the opportunity to revise their work (as well as that of their predecessors), adding increased functionality and sustainability. “[We] challenged our designers to bring their designs forward with innovative products that belong in the future,” Janice Simonsen, Ikea’s design spokesperson, says.

The results make their debut at the Milan Furniture Fair as part of the company’s PS collection, a curated series released every three years. This time around, the 60-year-old company decided to revisit its past as a way of creating pieces that address today’s needs for more flexible solutions to small spaces: chairs stack, furniture can transition from indoors to outdoors, a children’s table contains built-in storage, and various products have been upgraded using green materials such as bamboo.

Whereas the brother-and-sister design team Knut and Marianne Hagberg reimagined one of their own designs from the ‘80s, turning a children’s foam indoor chair into a plastic, stackable armchair that can also be used outdoors, Nike Karlsson updated a ’70s metal tube sofa with pocket springs, which not only add comfort but are easy to recycle.

And while the inspiration for these and the rest of the 46-pieces are from the past, they should not be mistaken as being from another era. “In the design world, it’s sometimes fashionable to talk about vintage and release new products in old styles,” Peter Klinkert, Ikea’s PS project leader, says in the press announcement. “We always said that we don’t want to relaunch old things. It’s not IKEA PS. It’s not new and developing IKEA onward.” The PS Collection will roll into stores in August.

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