Keigo Harada’s Flashlight retained its basic shape…

…but Harada refined the detail of how it would charge…

…and added a strip of LED lights that could turn the flashlight into a banner, when waved around.

Andy Logan cleaned up the detail and rethought the shape of the goggles on his Ski Helmet…

..and also added a dashy graphic that would fit right in with the original 1963 911 upon which the helmet was based.

Logan also created a second version of his design, which was meant to reference the modern 911.

Logan also created a second version of his design, which was meant to reference the modern 911.

Taking the advice of the judges, Allen Zadeh further explored the details in the suspension of his Ice Yacht.

Taking the advice of the judges, Allen Zadeh further explored the details in the suspension of his Ice Yacht.

He also added chrome detailing that makes the historical 911 references stronger.

He also added chrome detailing that makes the historical 911 references stronger.

Junggi Sung’s Hair Dryer impressed many of the judges…

…they just wondered whether it could incorporate functional details, such as an on/off switch and power control.

Sung integrated the on-off switch into the socket…

…and nodded to the Porsche’s gear shifter in the controls.

Timo Urala added a slew of more fully realized details to his Microhouse…

…including an interior rendering…

…and a floorplan showing its layout.

…and a floorplan showing its layout.

For his Speaker, Pablo Eduardo Charosky refined the controls on the shaft, referencing the 1984 911.

For his Speaker, Pablo Eduardo Charosky refined the controls on the shaft, referencing the 1984 911.

For his Speaker, Pablo Eduardo Charosky refined the controls on the shaft, referencing the 1984 911.

Guy Ceder chose to keep his Power Source idea--for a removable Porsche battery--largely unchanged.

Guy Ceder chose to keep his Power Source idea--for a removable Porsche battery--largely unchanged.

Guy Ceder chose to keep his Power Source idea--for a removable Porsche battery--largely unchanged.

Guy Ceder chose to keep his Power Source idea--for a removable Porsche battery--largely unchanged.

Vote Now For Your Favorite, In Our Porsche Next Design Challenge

Each of the finalists added clever tweaks, based on the judges’ feedback. And now, you can weigh in too.

Maybe you heard, but a couple months ago we announced a contest that asked all comers to design an object inspired by the Porsche 911. We left almost everything up to the imaginations of the entrants--the only thing we really specified was that the designs had to be bigger than a purse and smaller than a living room. And we also left it up to entrants to figure out what details of the 911 they wanted to highlight.

As a result, we got all kinds of amazing stuff, ranging from an ice yacht to a hairdryer to a micro house. Then, we winnowed the 430 entries into a Top 25. Then we winnowed those into a Top 7. And then we asked our judges to deliver feedback on each one of those finalists. Before the final judging begins, we allowed entrants to tweak their work, based on those critiques. Here they are and now that they’re done, we’re welcoming you to vote on your favorite, via the module you see on the right.

Junggi Sung’s hair dryer, which now sports an on/off switch and a refined interface.
Andy Logan created a new version of his Ski Helmet.

Most all of the changes you’ll see in the Top 7 entries were minor, but usually they had to do with details that would fully realize the ideas which were already there in spades. How would something turn on? Could that detail be refined? You can see a rundown of how each of the entries changed in the slideshow above. Thank you again to everyone that entered, and a special thanks to all of the Top 7, who labored mightily. Soon we’ll reveal the judge’s pick for the best design, and the people’s choice pick as well. Stay tuned.

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3 Comments

  • icam16

    What program or combination of programs are used to make awesome renderings like these?

  • Andy @ AWOL Company

     The helmet was designed in Alias Design 2011, and rendered in Keyshot 2.
    Alias is (from my perspective as an experienced product designer) THE best CAD
    application for product design, especially if you quickly want to go from rough
    idea to 3D concept like this helmet. This helmet CAD model only took about 10 hours to build. Alias has a great real-time psuedo-renderer, but an extremely poor high-quality renderer, so you have to generate actual renderings in something like Keyshot. Keyshot is very quick in getting a beautiful image with great lighting and materials in just a few hours. Then just a minor amount of retouching and you're done. 

  • Jack

    I would also like to know what programs, especially what the helmet was designed in.