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Simple Genius

The Egg Carton Reinvented, To Save Space and Materials

Why redesign perfectly acceptable packaging? Because there’s room for improvement.

  • <p>Otília Andrea Erdélyi redesigned the lowly egg carton using the minimal amount of material.</p>
  • <p>The container flips open to take up very little counter space.</p>
  • <p>The elliptical openings allow the consumer to inspect the eggs without opening the package.</p>
  • <p>The package is held closed with a paper wrapper that provides space for branding.</p>
  • <p>The package extends over the sides of the eggs, to provide protection against breaking.</p>
  • <p>Fully open.</p>
  • 01 /07

    Otília Andrea Erdélyi redesigned the lowly egg carton using the minimal amount of material.

  • 02 /07

    The container flips open to take up very little counter space.

  • 03 /07

    The elliptical openings allow the consumer to inspect the eggs without opening the package.

  • 04 /07

    The package is held closed with a paper wrapper that provides space for branding.

  • 05 /07

    The package extends over the sides of the eggs, to provide protection against breaking.

  • 06 /07

    Fully open.

  • 07 /07

The standard cardboard egg carton has been around a long, long time, basically because it does a serviceable job of keeping eggs from getting broken. But that doesn’t mean it couldn’t be improved, as a Hungarian graphic design student shows with her smart redesign: a spare, stackable container made from a single piece of cardboard that cleanly flips open while maintaining a compact footprint.

"My goal was to design an innovative package using a small amount of material," writes Otília Andrea Erdélyi, who is currently a master’s student at Moholy-Nagy University. Indeed, the carton is economical, with elliptical cutouts that allow consumers to inspect the eggs without opening the box. And although the sides are exposed, Erdélyi insists that package still provides ample protection, especially if it stays right side up. (We featured a similar, though arguably less successful, rethink last year.)

Quibbles aside, Erdélyi’s packaging stands as an egg-cellent model of how the "less is more" ethos leads to incremental changes that can have a much greater impact.

H/T The Dieline

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