This plant stand, by Nicolas Cortolezzis, can reside outside or inside. Arranged in multiples, they double as room dividers.

This multipurpose end table can have one of three different surfaces: indented for holding fruit, or with buckets for plants or other objects. The frame is made of bamboo. $49

This version has four built-in bowls for plants or knickknacks.

“Tea trolleys feel old-fashioned,” Ola Wihlborg says, “but there’s still a need today for mobile things.” Her solution: A steel coffee table on casters that provides storage. $49

“I love bright colors and dots, and that became the foundation of my design,” Maria Vinka says. “On one of the rugs, the dots are cut out, and on the other rug, the dots are in raised relief, so the pile itself becomes a decorative element in the design.” $49–$149

“I love bright colors and dots, and that became the foundation of my design,” Maria Vinka says. “On one of the rugs, the dots are cut out, and on the other rug, the dots are in raised relief, so the pile itself becomes a decorative element in the design.” $49–$149

To achieve a feeling of lightness, Nike Karlsson used tubular steel to construct the frame of his sofa. He also opted for pocket springs, commonly found in mattresses, because they can be recycled. $899

Designed by Ehlén Johansson, t his reconfigurable five-drawer chest can be customized with another six-drawer set ($150) or mirror ($49.99). All the pieces are made from fast-growing pine and painted red on the inside. $399

Designed by Ehlén Johansson, t his reconfigurable five-drawer chest can be customized with another six-drawer set ($150) or mirror ($49.99). All the pieces are made from fast-growing pine and painted red on the inside. $399

A small 1950s table lamp with a tutu-like shade inspired Wiebe Braasch contribution to the collection. “Because it was quite shy, I decided it would be nice to blow up the design and it more elegant, majestic, daring, and contemporary,” Braasch says. She replaced the bulbous shape of the original base with a steel tube and the standard bulb with an LED. $99.99

Johanna Jelinek’s LED lamp sports a midcentury-modern shade and swings flat against the wall when not in use. $49.99

Marcus Arvonen combined two classic Ikea chairs--one made of wood, the other of plastic--resulting in a wood-plastic–composite armchair. $59.99

One of our absolute favorites, this armchair by Ebba Strandmark has an extra-high back. Now it’s easier to sit down and stand up,” the designer says, “and you can lean comfortably and spend hour after hour in the company of good friends.” $89

Henrik Preutz derived inspiration from both classic pendants and modern LED technology, which is built into the faceted shade.

Co.Design

Based On Archival Designs, Ikea's PS Collection Hits Stores This Month

For its seventh limited-edition run, Ikea challenged its in-house design team to revisit the archives and update vintage pieces to today’s standards.

Earlier this year in Milan, Ikea unveiled its PS Collection, a limited-edition series of furnishings released every three years to push the envelope of the company’s mainstream offerings. At the time, we lauded it as the best effort in the program’s seven-year history—and now it’s finally hitting stores in the U.S.

To recap, for this year’s collection, the Swedish purveyor of affordable goods asked its in-house designers to reinterpret products from the company’s past, updating them using innovative forms, increased functionality, and sustainable materials. The results—46 pieces in all—are affordable, dynamic solutions for small spaces: mismatched drawers form a chest of drawers, vintage-inspired lamps contain LEDs, and plant stands double as room dividers.

That said, the products aren’t haute-couture Ikea; in fact, they all stem from the brand’s commitment to creating simple, livable forms. "[W]e don’t do Ikea PS collections just to make a kind of intellectual discourse about our design passion," PS Project Leader Peter Klinkert is quoted as saying in the press release. “It’s much more about creating relevancy for the many people at home. Design belongs in real homes.” We’ve selected our favorites from the collection in the slide show.

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