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Innovation By Design

An Elegant Desktop Composter That Automatically Feeds Your Plants

This student concept counters the pungent smell of home composting with a Prius-like halo effect.

  • <p>The Re-Feed features an "umbilical cord" for plants.</p>
  • <p>It takes your scraps.</p>
  • <p>"Plugs in" to a plant.</p>
  • <p>And grinds food scraps with a touch of a button.</p>
  • <p>It can be scheduled to feed your plant when you’re not around.</p>
  • <p>A simple pump-powered tube feeds nutrient-rich liquid to attached greenery.</p>
  • 01 /07

    The Re-Feed features an "umbilical cord" for plants.

  • 02 /07

    It takes your scraps.

  • 03 /07

    "Plugs in" to a plant.

  • 04 /07

    And grinds food scraps with a touch of a button.

  • 05 /07

    It can be scheduled to feed your plant when you’re not around.

  • 06 /07

    A simple pump-powered tube feeds nutrient-rich liquid to attached greenery.

  • 07 /07

To the average city dweller, urban composting is almost an oxymoron. The earthy rot of food scraps is precisely why we keep our apartment kitchens clean. Yet, with the recent laws in San Francisco, urban composting could be around to stay.

The Re-Feed was a student concept by Fanny Nilsson that reimagines composting for city schedules. It’s an indoor composter, but rather than promising heaps of soil, it’s only looking to feed your houseplants with some "liquid nourishment." You drop in compostable items—your standard array of organic scraps—and a battery-powered blade grinds up the waste. It composts, and when that process is complete, water is added to the mix.

This nutrient-rich liquid is fed to plants through a tube that reaches straight into the roots of a complementary flower pot, a feeding that can even be scheduled by the less-attentive plant owner.

Of course, this convenience is great, but none of that addresses what Nilsson admits is the "biggest barrier" of home composting, the smell. "The aim of the project was to address this negative association with a positive one, which is embodied by the nurturing of the plant," she tells Co.Design. In other words, a home with a Re-Feed is sort of like a home with a baby. The dirty diaper smell comes with the territory.

If you aren’t entirely sold on the idea that lifestyle can manage social odor perception (and I don’t blame you), the plastic casing has also been treated with an odor-absorbing compound to manage the smell between cleanings. And if you still aren’t sold entirely on in-home composting, just STOP COOKING SO MUCH DAMN KALE. I mean, c’mon people.

See more here.