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Bike Spikes Allow For Urban Rides In The Snow

Dutch designer Cesar van Rongen developed two-wheeled grip for the winter cyclist.

  • <p>Dutch designer Cesar van Rongen developed <a href="http://www.cesarvanrongen.nl/projecten/sneeuwketting.html" target="_blank">Sneeuwketting</a>, or “snow chain,” to facilitate cycling in the snow.</p>
  • <p>The rubber accessories roll right onto a tire for easy installation (not pictured: snow).</p>
  • <p>The bike spikes add very little additional heft to the wheels.</p>
  • <p>A close-up of the clever Sneeuwketting.</p>
  • <p>These are just a prototype, designed as part of van Rongen’s graduation project from the Design Academy Eindhoven.</p>
  • <p>Just a PSA: Don’t forget to wear a helmet, kids.</p>
  • 01 /06

    Dutch designer Cesar van Rongen developed Sneeuwketting, or “snow chain,” to facilitate cycling in the snow.

  • 02 /06

    The rubber accessories roll right onto a tire for easy installation (not pictured: snow).

  • 03 /06

    The bike spikes add very little additional heft to the wheels.

  • 04 /06

    A close-up of the clever Sneeuwketting.

  • 05 /06

    These are just a prototype, designed as part of van Rongen’s graduation project from the Design Academy Eindhoven.

  • 06 /06

    Just a PSA: Don’t forget to wear a helmet, kids.

Commuting is always more of a slog in the winter, whether you’re on public transport or driving yourself. But what if a bicycle is your preferred mode of transit from here to there? For his graduation project at the Design Academy Eindhoven, Dutch designer Cesar van Rongen developed an ingenious solution for the two-wheeled set to use during the oh-so- cold-and-slippery season.

"When I started looking at situations that didn’t work so well on a bike, snow was the biggest problem," van Rongen tells Co.Design. So he started a year-long process to develop Sneeuwketting, or "snow chain," a prototype that would give cyclists legitimate grip when rolling over urban terrain. Models were tested in everything from metal to fabric, but in the end it was a somewhat obvious material that worked the best. "I ended with rubber just like a normal tire, for the comfort of riding," he says.

Installation is incredibly easy—simply spin them onto the tire and secure the ends together—and once they’re in place, fresh powder in the city is easily conquered. The idea is still a concept, but van Rongen is hoping to put them into production next year.