Jeongmoon Choi uses store-bought fluorescent cords to create these black-light wonderlands of perfect, space-altering geometry.

“Visitors are initially confused; at the first look they lose orientation,” Choi says.

She often gets a feel for the space without the use of extensive sketches.

“I usually start with a model and the initial structure, but also many ideas come up in the implementation,” she says.

“I realized that the darkening of the room creates a new entity, which additionally leads to a stronger contrast between the drawing and the surrounding space.”

Welcome to Tron!

Determining the setup takes anywhere from a moment to several days, during which she imagines “movements” along the floor, walls, and ceiling.

It’s a little like a laser-light show--sans lasers.

She forms perfect lines with a special technique involving stretching, knotting, and glue.

Stretching the threads through the open space completely changes the effect of an all-but-empty room.

Stunning.

After the initial disorientation, visitors find themselves achieving next-level awareness in Choi’s installations. “Oftentimes they’re are put in a meditative state, and feel very relaxed and at peace.”

Co.Design

Thread Installations That Look Like They're Straight Out Of Tron

Jeongmoon Choi transforms empty rooms into elegant neon labyrinths using fluorescent cords.

For those of you who’ve ever fantasized of making like a young Jeff Bridges transported into the Tron mainframe, or experiencing an epic laser show from the inside out, Jeongmoon Choi’s eye-popping installations just might make all your dreams come true. For years, the Korean-born, Berlin-based artist has been exploring the recurring theme of “drawing in space,” transforming staid interiors into incredibly precise geometrical labyrinths.

“When I started, I experimented a lot with materials and the character of the locations where I set up my installations,” Choi tells Co.Design. “I realized that the darkening of the room creates a new entity, which additionally leads to a stronger contrast between the drawing and the surrounding space.”

The orientation and physicality of the sites themselves are integral components of Choi’s work. Determining the setup takes anywhere from a moment to several days, during which she imagines “movements” along the floor, walls, and ceiling--sometimes even walking with string to track her path and mark the main points of contact--as opposed to completing detailed sketches or extensive plans.

Using primarily store-bought fluorescent cords, she forms perfect lines with a special technique involving stretching, knotting, and glue. “I usually start with a model and the initial structure, but also many ideas come up in the implementation,” she says. She also includes pure white thread that glows blue-violet when the black light is turned on but becomes nearly invisible when it’s off. The effect is a clever mix of analog and ephemeral, where the void of an empty room becomes somehow tangible.

“Visitors are initially confused; at the first look, they lose orientation,” Choi says. Given time, however, after exploring the area and experiencing a range of different perspectives, that discombobulation transforms into something else entirely. “Oftentimes they’re put in a meditative state and feel very relaxed and at peace.”

(H/t Triangulation Blog)

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