There aren’t scenes from a new Shia LeBouf-starring Indiana Jones sequel (thank goodness). They’re photos of the tunnels currently under construction below New York City.

The photos, posted recently by the MTA, show the progress on the East Side Access construction project.

Slated for completion in 2019, it will eventually connect the Long Island Rail Road lines to Grand Central Terminal.

It’s a massive undertaking.

And all the while the city hustles and bustles above.

Thankfully, we’re not just sending people down there with shovels.

These types of tunnels are excavated using a variety of heavy-duty machines, including massive 200-ton drills that are so big, and so unwieldy, that in some cases it’s actually far less expensive to just leave them down there after they’re done working--which is exactly what we did with one such machine involved in the East Side Access project last year.

The photos serve as a nice reminder that when you’re taking the subway or traveling out of Grand Central, you really are underground.

In some of the most impressive tunnels, especially considering their location, that modern technology can burrow.

Co.Design

An Unbelievable Glimpse Of The Tunnels In Progress Beneath New York City

A little reminder of what’s going on underneath that Gray’s Papaya.

It’s easy to take the subway for granted. Just like other subterranean marvels of engineering, it’s a system that’s deliberately hidden from view--you descend into a station, plunge into darkness, and arrive at your destination. In fact, you might forget you’re actually underground the whole time. But you are, and these new photos from the MTA serve as a nice reminder of how much work it takes to put you there.

The pictures show the current progress of the MTA’s East Side Access project, one which doesn’t actually involve a subway but rather will connect the Long Island Rail Road to Grand Central Terminal for the first time. It’s currently expected to open in 2019. It involves a lot of digging.

Thankfully, we’re not just sending people down there with shovels. These types of tunnels are excavated using a variety of heavy-duty machines, including massive 200-ton drills that are so big, and so unwieldy, that in some cases it’s actually far less expensive to just leave them down there after they’re done working--which is exactly what they did with one such machine involved in the East Side Access project last year.

See more of the MTA’s photos here.

[Hat tip: Gizmodo]

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3 Comments

  • tony j spedale

     Your underground tunnels photos are
    unbelievable I liked how the colors  
    of the dirt & concrete stood out in contrast with the different types of light real or artificial the red of the welding flames the orange of workers vests & in one where they marked places with orange paint.Underground Art Gallery Thanks for sharing a view of a space we take foe granted