Pocket Cycle is an app that makes menstrual cycle tracking something a couple can share.

Its key UI feature is a rounded day calendar. You can also set custom reminders around various events.

It’s built for privacy--intimacy even--as the app is only shared between two people, and nothing scheduled makes its way to Apple’s calendar.

If a cycle goes long or short, no problem, just wind the calendar like a rotary dial to reset it.

The app runs $1 on the iPhone.

And it’s also available for the iPad.

Co.Design

Pocket Cycle: A New App For Couples Trying To Conceive

One app attempts to tackle the tacit conversations behind that time of the month.

If you hadn’t figured it out, ladies, men have no clue when your periods will occur. And unless you’ve been trying to get pregnant, the concept of "ovulation" hasn’t even crossed his mind. I know, I know—you’ve been dating the same guy for years! He remembers your anniversary and somehow knows your cup size! We don’t get it, either.

Pocket Cycle ($1) is the first app from Perigee, and in a world full of ovulation apps and period trackers, it’s unique in that it’s been designed to facilitate conversation between men and women.

"Our primary users are couples," Prerigee’s Naim Cesur tells Co.Design. "They will no longer have to talk about what day in the month it is in the heat of the moment, the app supports both couples that want to get pregnant and those who would like to avoid it. "And no surprise weekend will be ruined by discussing when it’s a good time."

The first time you boot Pocket Cycle, you’re asked if you’re a man or a woman. If you’re a woman, you enter your cycle length and the first day of your last period, then invite your partner over. If you’re a man, you can pretty much just invite your partner to join the app. When an invite is accepted, a heart joins two names, and suddenly, you’re in this thing together. There’s no room for a third or sharing results on Facebook. It’s designed to feel intimate, and I’d argue that it really does.

"The tone was vital for Pocket Cycle. For example in the graphical design we wanted an appliance feel to the app that was natural to use for both men and women (in contrast to the existing pink floral designs or black gunmetal and red)," Cesur explains. "However, as an appliance, it had to avoid being too neutral or cold like a pregnancy test or kitchen appliance. The user had to feel the app had a warmth and soul to make them feel welcome and understand this is just as much about love as it is health care."

The pastel wheel becomes a gender-neutral means for both partners to follow the cycle. If it runs long or short—yeah, dudes, that happens—the woman can simply spin the wheel to the appropriate day and recalibrate. (And in a clever UI touch, men, too, can spin the wheel all they like, but it’ll just spin back.)

Interestingly enough, you can set custom notifications like "take the pill" or "get busy today," but there’s no sharing these reminders between partners. So while the app promotes a level of open dialog from the start, there’s no opportunity to say "make it rain tampon wrappers, sweetie!" at the critical moment. Well, not unless you want to use real words, in which case you wouldn’t need this app in the first place.

Download it here.

[Image: Egg Timer via Shutterstock]

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