This is an 80-foot slide hiding in a historic, NYC skyscraper.

It’s part of a residential makeover of an amazingly luxurious, four-story penthouse.

The slide brings you right into the living room.

It’s a celebration of the apartment’s vast, vertical space of the old steel-frame building.

Here’s where the ride ends.

Don’t worry, everyone watching TV is used to the giggles by now.

But the slide is just one way to have fun. Handholds accent one of the main beams, coaxing you to climb up.

If you’re bold enough, you’ll reach the "nest," a space tucked in between girders.

Don’t worry, they have safety equipment.

It’s dizzying, no?

Aside from these whimsical touches, the space is a celebration of geometry. Here’s the skylight in the foyer.

Aside from these whimsical touches, the space is a celebration of geometry. Here’s the skylight in the foyer.

Aside from these whimsical touches, the space is a celebration of geometry. Here’s the skylight in the foyer.

Aside from these whimsical touches, the space is a celebration of geometry. Here’s the skylight in the foyer.

Aside from these whimsical touches, the space is a celebration of geometry. Here’s the skylight in the foyer.

Aside from these whimsical touches, the space is a celebration of geometry. Here’s the skylight in the foyer.

Aside from these whimsical touches, the space is a celebration of geometry. Here’s the skylight in the foyer.

Aside from these whimsical touches, the space is a celebration of geometry. Here’s the skylight in the foyer.

The apartment has 360-degree views of the city.

You’ll find it inside the American Tract Society Building.

That’s one of the earliest steel-framed skyscrapers in the city.

See? There’s even an old timey photo to prove it.

Co.Design

An NYC Penthouse With An 80-Foot Slide Inside

An inventive take on an old space goes well beyond the typical landmark restoration.

The American Tract Society Building is one of the oldest surviving skyscrapers in NYC. Tucked away inside is a four-story, 6,500-foot expanse with full panoramic views of the city. It had never been inhabited, until now.

David Hotson, along with Ghislaine Viñas, made over the space as a home that’s equal parts whimsical and austere. The original arched windows and many of the original steel beams stayed intact, but the verticality has been transformed with bold, playful features. Hotson has said that he wanted to "constantly exploit the fact that we’re sitting on top of a skyscraper in Manhattan."

And while a glance at the dizzying array of beams hanging overhead demonstrates that idea, it’s a concept taken to new heights with an 80-foot slide that snakes straight into the living room, a clear bridge that appears to float in midair, and handholds that allow you to climb a central support beam like a rock wall. If you make it part way up, you can lounge in the "nest," an intimate nook squeezed within the structure’s girders. From there you can keep climbing to an almost attic-style space.

Of course, what you miss in these still photos are the incredible facets and "voids"—the geometric frames within frames that connect rooms like fractals. There’s some stunning camera work in the embedded video that illustrates these moments better than words can, and they reveal a level of design thinking that transcends what one might otherwise pigeonhole as an 80-foot-long gimmick.

But I mean, what a gimmick!

See more here.

[Hat tip: Fubiz]

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14 Comments

  • trxr

    Ugh, I keep expecting a voice to say from the red glowing light: "This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it, Dave."

    White on white on white. Blergh.

    "The most important aspect of an architect is to delineate space". Omg, I would not hire this dude. No, the most important thing for an architect to do is create a *liveable* space (which would include the engineering, shape, materials, blah blah blah).

  • Liosalpha

     I would hate to be the one who need to clean the place...
    besides that,  it looks more like a kidsplay ground than a house.

  • Guest

    Found myself thinking the same thing. Then I realized that anyone wealthy enough to live there has probably never touched a vacuum, or dust-rag in their life.

  • amanda

    This place is seriously bizarre. I can't decide if I love or loathe it. Maybe both?