The Chart of Collegiate Sports Teams is the latest from Pop Chart Labs, a massive map laying out the mascots for more than 1,100 schools from Division I to Division III.

Animals take up a considerable amount of real estate, with Bulldogs an especially popular choice.

Tigers, Wildcats, and Cougars are also big hubs.

Sure, you know some Eagles--but do you know all the Golden Eagles? And the Owls?

Self-referential teams are surprisingly abundant. Go Utah Utes!

Of course, there are some unique snowflakes in the bunch--not actual "Snowflakes," though there are several Storms, a few Tornadoes, two Thunders, a Lightning, and a Dust Devil.

Meredith Avenging Angels! Wait, are angels supposed to be vengeful?

Infographic: An Amazing Map Of Every College Mascot

Go Whittier Poets!

Michigan is my hometown school (yeah, I don’t want to talk about it), and I always thought we had the wolverine all to ourselves. Apparently not so! The 30,000 undergrads at Utah Valley University, I’ve learned, proudly call themselves Wolverines, too, as do the 2,000-some students at Wesley College, in Delaware. And if you’ve always thought your alma mater’s mascot was unique, well, I’ve got some bad news for you.

The Chart of Collegiate Sports Teams is the latest from Pop Chart Labs, a massive map laying out the mascots for more than 1,100 schools from Division I to Division III. Unsurprisingly, a good deal of real estate is dedicated to animals. It’s there you’ll find the Wolverines (in the "weasel family" subcategory of the "mammals" section), along with big names like the Minnesota Golden Gophers and some lesser-known ones like the Rhodes College Lynx. Bulldogs and Tigers are both significant hubs, though the Eagle looks to be the most popular mascot of all, with 60 schools claiming it as their avatar.

Of course, there are some unique snowflakes in the bunch--not actual "Snowflakes," though there are several Storms, a few Tornadoes, two Thunders, a Lightning, and a Dust Devil. Some of the more colorful among them include the Brandeis Judges, the UMASS-Dartmouth Corsairs, and the Akron Zips.

But it’s the students of Webster University, just outside St. Louis, that can be most sure of their mascot staying their own. The Gorlok, a mythical creature with the paws of a cheetah, the horns of a buffalo, and the face of a Saint Bernard, was created in a schoolwide contest in 1984.

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24 Comments

  • TK

    The problem with the "Zips" in the classificatory scheme is that they're not things - they're kangaroos!

  • Mark Latz

    Loyola University Chicago Ramblers

    Largest Jesuit university in the United States
    Ranked #106 Best University by US News & Rankings
    Won an NCAA Men's Basketball National Championship

    Can't make it to this list though...

  • Taylor Holland

    Oklahoma belongs in "Settlers & Explorers." Tired of #garbage #infographics ... #lookitup

  • Patrick @ PCL

    The term "sooner" did originally refer to a settler of the midwest, but since it was later applied generally to residents of Oklahoma (and Sooner State is now the state's official nickname), we put them under State Nicknames.

  • Nate

    You're from Michigan but neglected Grand Valley State University? There's even a Lakers category! Bummer.

  • Patrick

    The "tide" in Crimson Tide refers to a group of elephants.  They are called a herd now, but as the legend goes, they were once called a tide.

  • Guest

    Under "snakes", you have "Florida State Mocs" instead of "Chattanooga Mocs". Moreover, the "Moc" in question is no longer a snake; it is a mockingbird.

  • Jimjim421

    Um...Bearcats are NOT mythological.  They're a real animal.  While there are various origins for the use of Bearcats (or Bear-Cats) as college mascots, they do exist, at least as the common names of actual living creatures.  Case in point:  The Binturong of southeast Asia, AKA the Bearcat or Bearkat.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B...

  • HBJ

    Old Dominion's mascot is a lion, but they are called the Monarchs. Does this really count as "royalty," or should it be in the "lion" cateogry?

  • Patrick @ PCL

    We classified strictly by name, rather than mascot. Lots of teams have mascots that don't match up with their team name--like the elephant for the Crimson Tide, the tree for the Stanford Cardinal, etc. Maybe we'll tackle mascots in a separate chart!

  • cyde

    Wait... so you listed the various SUNY Red Dragon teams under 'dragons,' but the Alabama Crimson Tide under 'colors'?

    Seriously? 

    Were there no other teams who could have fit into a 'geophysical phenomena' category or something?

  • Patrick @ PCL

    We put them under colors because they weren't named after an actual "crimson tide" (as in an algae bloom in a body of water). They were first known as the Crimson or the Crimson White because of their uniform colors, until a sportswriter described their offense as moving like a "Crimson Tide." We figured that rooted the name in more of an abstraction than an actual, physical tide.

  • Patrick @ PCL

    They were originally so named because the Portland Trailblazers were a popular NBA team at the time--UAB originally only had a basketball team. When they revised their logo in the 90s they added a dragon (it was actually a rejected logo from when the NBA Nets were considering changing their name to the Swamp Dragons), but we charted according to the original intent behind the name.