Yvette Yang’s fashion fonts capture entire seasons of fashion in alphabetic form.

The Paris-based designer does everything by hand, isolating sleeves, shoes, and more to create her letters.

She’s been working on the project since 2007, dedicating a set to each spring/summer and fall/winter collection.

The results are fascinating whether you stay up to date with your haute couture or not.

Here, removed of labels, designers, models, runway events, look books, and all the other fashion industry trappings, it’s just so many sartorial details left to consider.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

Co.Design

A Typeface Made Entirely Of The Season's Hottest Clothes

Yvette Yang’s Fashion Font catalogs the world of style from A to Z.

A billowing, disembodied sleeve. An uncomfortable looking shoe without a mate. A handbag, or a wallet, or a clutch (or whatever those things are called). It can be easy to miss these sorts of details when you’re poring over high-fashion photography, but removing those individual items from their original context can be surprisingly insightful. And that’s just what Yvette Yang does.

Every year since 2007, the Paris-based designer has celebrated two passions--typography and fashion--in the most straightforward way possible: dismembering fashion photos by hand and rearranging them into the letters of the alphabet. At this point, her Fashion-Fonts series includes eleven sets in all, with alphabets dedicated to the spring/summer and fall/winter looks each year--a sort of typographic time capsule of what’s in during a given season.

The results are fascinating whether you stay up to date with your haute couture or not (I don’t). Here, removed of labels, designers, models, runway events, look books and all the other fashion industry trappings, it’s just so many sartorial details left to consider. Many of which, I think, look much more reasonable and wearable and approachable here than they do in their usual context: as outrageous outfits on outrageously beautiful people.

See more of Yang’s fashion fonts here.

[Hat tip: Trendland]

Add New Comment

0 Comments