The Counterweight Concept is a new lighting collection from the Fort Standard. Gregory Buntain, one half of the design duo, describes the mobile Counterweight as a see-saw: “If the hanging point--or ‘fulcrum’--was even half of an inch in either direction, the balance of the lights would be totally offset.”

The series is the first in lighting from the New York-based Fort Standard design studio.

Fort Standard opted for a mix of polished white oak with brass, tone, and kiln-formed glass diffusers for the collection.

The materials originated from Fort Standard’s surroundings and experiments. The kiln-formed glass is sourced from an old glass facility in their building in the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn.

And the white oak wood came from experiments with steam bending wood, to make bows for archery. "We decided this would be a great way to create beautifully gestural designs.”

The Counterweight concept is consistent in its design elements, but is also available in a pendant light, a floor light, and a sconce.

Experimental Lighting That Balances Like a See-Saw

Fort Standard’s debut lighting series put some experiments with physics to good use.

It’s either the most grown up hanging mobile, or the most secretly playful piece of high end design. The Counterweight Mobile light mixes polished white oak with brass, tone, and kiln-formed glass diffusers—all of which simply hang from a thread-like cord and sway in midair, once in place.

Just think of a see-saw, Gregory Buntain, one half of the Fort Standard design duo, tells Co.Design. "If the hanging point—or ‘fulcrum’—was even half of an inch in either direction, the balance of the lights would be totally offset."

Most designers start with a project brief. The Fort Standard team, whose portfolio includes chic toys and magnets and the like, and retail spaces like the Warby Parker showroom, started differently in this case. They worked backward, selecting materials first: the kiln-formed glass came from an old glass facility that works in their building in the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn. And the white oak wood? "At the time we were experimenting with the process of steam bending wood in order to make bows for archery, and we decided this would be a great way to create beautifully gestural designs."

The Counterweight concept is also available in a pendant light, a floor light, and a sconce. All are available through Roll & Hill.

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