For an exhibit at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, Japanese artist Tokujin Yoshioka has built a chapel out of light.

In his 20s, the artist visited Henri Matisse’s Rosaire Chapel in Vence, France, and was deeply moved by the experience created by Matisse's colorful stained glass windows.

Yoshioka’s Rainbow Church skips the pigment found in traditional stained glass. Instead, he lets the light shine through 500 prisms.

The slender installation scales 40 feet high.

As light refracts through the prisms, it throws rainbow hues on the adjacent walls, creating an intangible yet powerful space.

As we saw recently, in Yoshioka's modular funhouse mirror, the artist is focusing more on light as a material.

Rainbow Church is built from light, the most ephemeral material of all.

"A dream to build architecture like this chapel came up to me strongly,” the artist says in a press release.

Yoshioka's Crystalize exhibit is on display at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo through January 19, 2014.

Co.Design

A Crystal "Church" That Could Make You Find God

Okay, maybe not quite. But Tokujin Yoshioka's latest installation is an eminently spiritual space constructed out of reflected light, and little else.

When we last checked in with master illusionist Tokujin Yoshioka, he was busy turning the world into a gorgeous funhouse. Now, for an exhibit at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, the Japanese artist is yet again playing with light in all the right ways—this time on a colossal scale.

The centerpiece of Yoshioka’s Rainbow Church is a tall, slender installation that's 40 feet tall and contains 500 crystal prisms. Light refracts through the prisms, throwing rainbow hues on the adjacent walls for a stained glass effect without the stained glass.

The spare aesthetic doesn’t make it easily apparent, but Rainbow Church is influenced by an experience from his early 20s, when he visited Henri Matisse’s Rosaire Chapel in Vence, France. “I had a mysterious experience of being filled with overwhelming light and vibrant colors,” the artist says in a press release. “A dream to build architecture like this chapel came up to me strongly.” In a departure from the tangible materials he's used in the past—foil for chairs, feathers for a snow-themed art installation—he’s building with light, the most ephemeral material of all.

Yoshioka's Crystalize exhibit is on display at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo through January 19, 2014.

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