Francophiles will drool over this neon vision of the City of Light by French artist Antoine Corbineau. Resembling pop-art stained glass, the 39"x 27" maps are available for 50 euro (about $68) here.

Casamista: for the dry-skinned and homesick traveler, an adorable travel humidifier shaped like a house. It screws on to any water bottle and generates mist for a dry or air-conditioned room. Casamista costs $25 through Umbra, and can be had here.

Achey bike butt, begone: Ideo took the classic Brooks English bike saddle--a beauty, but not exactly cushy--and made it comfortable. For style-savvy cyclists who want a Brooks English seat without the month-long break-in period, get a Cambium C17 seat for $195, through Brooks England.

Carrying cumbersome laptops and other devices through airport security is hands-down one of the most dreaded parts of traveling. Octovo, a new seven-piece line of leather goods and accessories designed by Ammunition, makes organizing luggage easy. It includes a Passport jacket; a sleek wallet that doubles as an iPhone sleeve; the 48HR carry-on bag, with padded side pocket ideally sized for a 13-inch MacBook Air; and the Layover iPad sleeve. Product packaging features antique photos of motorcycle racers and anorak-wearing explorers. Octovo can be found here.

With the Scratch Map, the travel-obsessed can have the satisfaction of scratching a lottery ticket without wasting money on a lottery ticket. It’s a huge world map that lets you scratch off places you’ve visited, revealing colors under a layer of gold foil and turning the piece into a personalized trophy wall. It can be found for $16 here.

Wearable tech isn’t just futuristic-chic--it also has the potential to save lives. The SEIL bag (pronounced Zail) is worn on a cyclist’s back and equipped with an LED light connected to a handlebar-mounted wireless controller. With glowing arrows, it indicates to surrounding traffic in which direction a cyclist is headed, letting them skip the dorky hand signals.

The jet-lagged can rest easy with the Ostrich Pillow, a cloth helmet that makes napping a dream wherever you travel--whether it’s in a cramped airplane seat or a long car ride. The original version of this head-Snuggie made wearers resemble freaky cranio-pods, but with the more discreet Ostrich Pillow Light, you don’t have to sacrifice too much style for shut-eye. It’s available here in both junior and adult sizes.

The much-hyped self-assembled Sandwichbike, by Bastens Leijh’s Dutch design studio Bleijh Industrial, is available to ship worldwide January 1, so you can be among the first to test out this innovative set of wheels, with a CNC-milled flat wood frame. “Unpacking your Sandwichbike should be like unwrapping a present,” says Leijh. It’s available for 750 euro (about $1032) here.

For the well-read Anglophile or simply for those who prefer literary journeys to physical ones, there’s the Book Map by Dorothy--a cartographer’s vision of famous places from all your favorite novels, superimposed over the landscape of London. Overlooking Middlemarch is the intersection between Bleak House and Fight Club, and Doctor Zhivago’s summer residence is in Gorky Park. High-quality prints of this fantastical map are available for around $40 from Dorothy’s shop.

For the jet-setting scooter-fanatic, the Acton M Scooter by designer Peter Treadway is a 70-pound electric model that folds down to the size of a wheeled carry-on bag. Skip the taxi at your destination airport and just scoot on down to your hotel! The Acton M Scooter is available for $1,799 on pre-order here.

Is this the last backpack you’ll ever have to buy? Designed to last a lifetime, the is made from durable canvas and held together with ultra-tough nylon thread to avoid the fraying and ripping that ends most backpacks’ lives after just a few years. If, at any point, a buyer decides she doesn’t want her Better Backpack anymore, its designers at Mijlo will offer a $10 rebate and give the bag a second life. You can pre-order it through a Kickstarter campaign for $59 here.

“Chic” and “toothbrush” aren’t often seen in the same sentence, but this is hands-down the chicest toothbrush we’ve ever seen (maybe because it’s the only chic toothbrush we’ve ever seen). From design firm Default, it’s got a versatile cap so it won’t get all gross in your luggage, and it's battery-operated and made to look as sleek as your iPhone. You can build your own brush with custom 3-D printed handles here.

A timepiece that simplifies the challenges of living in a different time zone from a loved one: the Long Distance Watch, designed by the Hong Kong-based studio Kitmen Keung. It displays two clocks in one face: one for the wearer’s time, and the other for the locale of your faraway love, whether it’s a boyfriend, a child abroad, or a globe-trotting sister. The Long Distance Watch costs $480, and can be found here.

It’s no secret that airplane food sucks. The next time your giftee ventures abroad, have him or her bring along The Daily Good for nutrition needs: it’s a packet of whole-food powder with 14 healthy ingredients that can slip easily in a carry-on or purse for on-the-go hydration and nourishment. You can buy a 30-day supply for $75 here.

The bolt is the world’s smallest iPhone charger -- carry-on bag-friendly for on-the-go battery-reviving. It’s available for $59.99 .

The new Adidas Minimalist Traveler's shoe by Tom Dixon is a bespoke collection of footwear perfect for the stylish globetrotter. It's available for $255 here.

16 Gift Ideas For People Who Travel Too Much

Including a self-assembled bike, a portable humidifier, a backpack that could last a lifetime, and more.

Whether it’s a jet-setting businessman uncle, a kid about to "study" abroad in Europe, or a pair of long-distance lovers, we all know people who can’t seem to stay in one place. Here’s our guide to the best-designed gifts for globetrotters.

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5 Comments

  • W. Pinkham

    I'm not entirely sure this list was created by anyone that actually travels much. I can get behind high-quality shoes, though at nearly $300, I wouldn't want to walk all day lest I leave gilded footprints in city streets. I can't see how hangable maps are useful for a traveler. Should I tape them to my chest? Travel junkies are realistic and discerning, bridging the divide between luxury and survivalist. We need gear that's lightweight, lasts forever and streamlines our life.

    Mind if I self promote for a moment? I've lived on the road for most of 2013, working at festivals and in coffee shops, exploring 18,000 miles of America in a small SUV. My gear/gift recommendations include SmartWool socks, the best water bottle, and the new Canon SL-1 D-SLR, which is as close to a mirrorless as you can get with still using a full range of lenses.

    That post is here: http://wesleypinkham.com/2013/...

  • Devin D

    Noooo! I read FastCo because you haven't (until now) succumbed to the trend of creating slideshows with no article and zero useful commentary. This article is just one giant ad. Maybe it's time to re-enable my ad filters...

  • Gutted

    It might be a one and done. Don't declare it a wasteland like Mashable just yet. :)

  • Devin D

    It's far from a wasteland! I found it ironic though that this kind of "article" (if it could even be called that) was published the same day I start seeing pop-ups asking me to turn off AdBlock as a way to help support creativity. This was uncharacteristically unoriginal compared to the rest of Ms. Dunne's work here :)