Psychopathic ladies, go ahead and ditch your boring, unfashionable tools of torture in a dumpster in a remote location immediately. Designer handbag label Her Royal Flyness has your needs covered with a limited-edition product called the Ex-Boyfriend Revenge Kit.

The perfect kit to help you "partake in a glamorous revenge mission" contains everything from pliers to chemical truth serum. The site notes: "Not all the items in the kit are able to be legally sold in all countries and may require permits."

Designer Lani Devine says she hoped to explore how an elegant design might change how we view ostensibly dangerous objects. Would they seem even more dangerous, or less? Could they even fit in with a designer bag's aesthetic?

She says the company doesn't "promote any type of real-life violence," and the items even scared her at first.

On the bright side, if you're into handbags but don't have any use for a balaclava, you can buy the purse sans weapons. Come for the violence, stay for the fashion!

Co.Design

"Ex-Boyfriend Revenge" Kit Encourages Women To Murder In Style

Why is a designer handbag company selling an all-inclusive domestic violence kit?

Psychopathic ladies, go ahead and ditch your boring, unfashionable tools of torture in a dumpster in a remote location immediately. Designer handbag label Her Royal Flyness has your needs covered.

The Australian brand has released a limited-edition product it calls an Ex-Boyfriend Revenge Kit—"the perfect item to partake in a glamorous revenge mission."

Included items:


• 1 Teal woven leather tote (43cm long x 26cm high x 16cm deep)
• 1 matching teal balaclava, for hiding your face and looking fabulous
• 1 teal mini crowbar, for gaining entrance with style
• 1 pair of soft teal leather gloves; to keep hands and surfaces clean
• 1 injection kit with a single dose of Amytal Sodium (truth serum)
• 1 roll teal bondage tape and matching teal rope
• 1 pair of limited edition high impact resin knuckledusters. Good for 1-2 punches only.

The whole set comes in a cute shade of teal, because if there's one thing that really ruins a girl's day, it's when her tie-downs totally clash with her torture pliers. The site notes: "Not all the items in the kit are able to be legally sold in all countries and may require permits."

Eek! The product is clearly meant as a joke, but a joke on what? The image of the spurned woman as batshit crazy? The fact that some 30% of women worldwide report having experienced violence at the hands of a significant other, and a significant number of women in jail were incarcerated for killing their abuser? Not totally sure. At more than $1,600 U.S. dollars, the kit's price tag certainly suggests that for most women, revenge is wildly out of reach.

Her Royal Highness founder and designer Lani Devine tells Co.Design that the company doesn't "promote any type of real-life violence," and the items even scared her at first. From a design perspective, though, she hoped to explore how an elegant design might change how we view ostensibly dangerous objects. Would they seem even more dangerous, or less? Could they even fit in with a designer bag's aesthetic? Could something used in an ugly way ever be beautiful?

There's a case to be made for using weapons to explore the relationship between design and violence. In fact, a new experiment at the Museum of Modern Art, called, aptly, Design and Violence, aims to examine just that relationship by looking at products and projects "that have an ambiguous relationship with violence, either masking it while at the same time enabling it; animating it in order to condemn it; or instigating it in order to prevent it."

So does making a set of brass knuckles a little more sparkly mask the damage they can do? Would we take an armed woman less seriously if she were wearing a dainty set of gloves? Probably. As transfixed by violent imagery as we are, we rarely see something unabashedly pretty—as these products clearly aim to be—as dangerous.

On the bright side, if you're into handbags but don't have any use for a balaclava, you can buy the purse sans weapons. Come for the violence, stay for the fashion!

[Hat tip: DesignTAXI]

Update: Devine clarifies that although no one has tried to buy the product yet, she doesn't plan on shipping any kits out. Any customers who bought the product would receive an instant refund, and "we'd probably put a note in there that suggests they seek counseling before contemplating any type of revenge mission on anyone," she says.

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11 Comments

  • AntonG

    I think it's harmless fun that made me laugh out loud. I have several female friends who will love the shit out of this for it's humor. I also find the design aspect really intriguing, it's quite an attractive set. People wouldn't blink twice if a model wore this out on a catwalk at Fashion Week.

    I don't see how this is this promoting murder or domestic violence either?
    Only a complete idiot could take this thing as real in any way. The headline above is a tad sensational if anything? Maybe break and enter and beating the truth out of someone (hence the truth serum) but not Murder? There are weapons much more suited to murder out there, at much easier access to people. And whether it's offensive is a personal opinion that not everyone agrees on EVER. As a matter of fact "I'm officially offended at how offended the offended people are getting at the non offensiveness of this. Let's all get offended, it's the new cool thing to do on the internet."

  • Andrew Crow

    Domestic violence is no joke, nor should it be glamorized in any way. This is disgusting regardless of which gender the violence is aimed at.

  • AlexDesign

    As a woman I for one love it and think it's really clever. Sure it's bold humour and some people will hate it, but
    people are so fucking over sensitive these days. They aren't promoting
    violence any more than a Zombie film or Computer Game. You can go buy a gun
    in Wallmart for Christ's sake. That's much more scary than a fake
    revenge kit you can't buy on the internet.

  • Rovettidesign

    Fucking stupid. Hey Shaunacy... you're better than this, I hope. This doesn't empower women at all, it perpetuates violence and stupidity. Congratulations on promoting violent horse-shit during the holiday season! Great Job! Fastco, slap yourself.
    Kudos to @likkav1 @eduzmi @erik schwan; solid comments.

  • Iikkav1

    Not sure if this is more sexist toward men or women. There's the obvious promotion of violence toward men that others have mentioned in the comments, but there's also the fact that it portrays women as petty emotional creatures whose lives revolve around their relationships to men.

  • Guest

    Shaunacy Ferro, perhaps it's necessary for you to mentally swap the gendered pronouns in your article to understand why some (me included) find it sickening that you're uncritically laughing along with this joke.

  • Chad Harris

    I think there is great humor in this- put aside all the political correct society bs these days and laugh at it... Hell- I am speaker and my title is called, " Kill the Competition- Like with an Axe"

  • Antoine D.

    This might not only be hurtfull to women's image, but more obviously that it actualy shamelessly promotes violence made to men. A product that would have the exact same message, in which males would of been raplaced by female and vis versa, would of been rightfully critisised for being misogynistic. We shouldnt promote and glamorise violance towards anyone.

  • Erik Schwan

    Put out an ex-girlfriend kit like this and see how the ACLU and NOW react. This is just another bad designer trying to push the envelope with shock value.