Designers with delicate sensibilities, look away. This may be the most hideous McMansion in America.

Built in 1956, this is "almost-famous pimp-turned-construction mini-magnate" Jerry A. Hostetler's Indianapolis Hearst Castle.

Minus the architectural prowess. Plus more balconies.

Without adhering to any particular aesthetic style, the eccentric Hostetler bought up his neighbors' houses and turned his original three-bedroom ranch house into a gaudy, enormous mansion featuring ballrooms, imported fountains, gargoyles, and a stone grotto hot tub.

Hostetler died in 2006, and the house is back on the market.

The four bedrooms and five bathrooms described in the listing don't do the mansion's enormity justice: pictures show a plethora of dining areas and entertainment rooms, as well as multiple sprawling decks and outdoor staircases.

The sheer plethora of patterns and textures jumbled together in each room makes it difficult to know where to rest your eyes.

Good design typically solves problems, but here it seems like Hostetler just created problems.

Good design typically solves problems, but here it seems like Hostetler just created problems.

Good design typically solves problems, but here it seems like Hostetler just created problems.

Just about every room contains its own staircase.

It can't be easy to navigate a house cobbled together piece by piece as Hostetler bought up the different properties around him.

Indeed, the place looks a little like Hostetler flipped through a book of architectural styles, pointed to a chapter and said, "Give me a little of this!" for each new room.

Many of the rooms appear to have inexplicably low ceilings and a cave-like quality.

"It was pretty clear from the start Jerry had his own ideas about architecture," a neighbor told the Indy Star last year.

In some rooms, the oddly shaped windows and stained glass don't appear to let in much actual light.

In some rooms, the oddly shaped windows and stained glass don't appear to let in much actual light.

In some rooms, the oddly shaped windows and stained glass don't appear to let in much actual light.

For reference, the Indy Star has some pictures of the property--and the man himself--in its heyday.

For reference, the Indy Star has some pictures of the property--and the man himself--in its heyday.

Have you started to get bedroom fatigue yet?

Have you started to get bedroom fatigue yet?

Have you started to get bedroom fatigue yet?

Have you started to get bedroom fatigue yet?

Have you started to get bedroom fatigue yet?

Have you started to get bedroom fatigue yet?

Hostetler--who in his early 20s may have been one of the top pimps in Indianapolis, nicknamed "Mr. Big" by police--turned a stone grotto into a hot tub.

Hostetler--who in his early 20s may have been one of the top pimps in Indianapolis, nicknamed "Mr. Big" by police--turned a stone grotto into a hot tub.

Hostetler--who in his early 20s may have been one of the top pimps in Indianapolis, nicknamed "Mr. Big" by police--turned a stone grotto into a hot tub.

So. Many. Balconies.

The house features plenty of weird statues, although some of its treasures, like a six-foot mermaid sculpture, have been sold off by creditors.

Imagine, this palace could be yours for a little less than $1.3 million.

Is This The Ugliest House In America?

What is even going on here.

Designers with delicate sensibilities, look away. This may be the most hideous McMansion in America. Built in 1956, this is "almost-famous pimp-turned-construction mini-magnate" Jerry A. Hostetler's Indianapolis Hearst Castle. Minus the architectural prowess. Plus more balconies.

Without adhering to any particular aesthetic style, the eccentric Hostetler bought up his neighbors' houses and turned his original three-bedroom ranch house into a gaudy, enormous mansion featuring ballrooms, imported fountains, gargoyles, and a stone grotto hot tub.

Hostetler died in 2006, and the house is back on the market. The four bedrooms and five bathrooms described in the listing don't do the mansion's enormity justice: pictures show a plethora of dining areas and entertainment rooms, as well as multiple sprawling decks and outdoor staircases. And, of course, plenty of weird statues, although some of its treasures, like a six-foot mermaid sculpture, have been sold off by creditors. The Indy Star has some pictures of the property--and the man himself--in its heyday.

Good design typically solves problems, but here it seems like Hostetler just created problems. The sheer plethora of patterns and textures jumbled together in each room makes it difficult to know where to rest your eyes. In some rooms, the oddly shaped windows and stained glass don't appear to let in much actual light, and just about every room contains its own staircase. It can't be easy to navigate a house cobbled together piece by piece as Hostetler bought up the different properties around him.

"It was pretty clear from the start Jerry had his own ideas about architecture," a neighbor told the paper last year. Indeed, the place looks a little like Hostetler flipped through a book of architectural styles, pointed to a chapter and said, "Give me a little of this!" for each new room.

Imagine, this palace could be yours for a little less than $1.3 million. Have you seen an uglier house? Let us know in the comments!

[H/T: Curbed]

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23 Comments

  • DC Grrl

    Calling this a McMansion is a misnomer. Its unique monstrosity takes it out of the carbon-copy category of McMansions imho. The sheer lack of consideration for architectural convention (not to mention neighbors, civil engineering...) pulls this out of the McMansion category.

  • Kathleen Johnson

    Personally, love it.
    They said the same things about Wrights homes also in the beginning.
    To each his own..........................

  • monix

    I love it. It's creative, that's for sure. If no one wants it, I'll take it in a heartbeat...although I don't have a million dollars in the bank, I wish...

  • Ron Vaughn

    I have been to a party at this house. It's really not as bad as you might think. It's my understanding that the former owner simply used excess materials that he had over bid for his construction jobs. I did see a lot of marble and is quite lovely. I know at the time I was there they only had two working restrooms but also had one room that had over 200 lights.

  • Ion Turcanu

    If this is the ugliest, than you should come to Romania.. People in here love this type of home decoration in here, and kitsch is omnipresent :)

  • Lpp Lpp

    Only someone has fucking retarded as you would use a cliche'd Chav phrase such as "Murican. Go back to playing COD and texting, computer pissant.

  • LincolnX

    This is what happens when you pass a house through a teleportation device like in The Fly.

  • chlyn

    I checked the dictionary. The Chateau d'Or in Bel Air is used to illustrate the concept of ugly:

  • Joe Melton

    What you don't understand: Jerry ran a construction business that scammed off materials costs. The point wasn't to build a home, the point was to just keep building with the most expensive materials possible as to create more false profits. There was no plan, ending design goal or finality. He just ran out of financing. One room has over 200 lights in the ceiling. Another is marble tile everywhere. The current owners is a great guy and friend, and he made the place livable. The bedrooms had no closets, there were only 2 working bathrooms. It took years and a lot more cost than is being asked. Was it worth it? Probably not financially, but we through some EPIC parties! I'm going to miss it.