Ten years ago, Ferruccio Laviani designed the Bourgie Table Lamp for Kartell. This year, Kartell commissioned new iterations of the Bourgie from its 14 designers. Here, Nendo's interpretation.

The Japanese studio played with the silhouette and transparency of the Bourgie, to create two lamps that click together like puzzle pieces.

Philippe Starck worked with the idea of ornamentation, and smothered his lamp in cheap bobbles and sidewalk jewelry.

Christophe Pillet's design turns the original clear polycarbonate lamp into a silhouette.

Patrick Jouin's inspirational rendition reads, "The future is a present from the past."

Eugeni Quitllet preserved many of the original Bourgie's elements: its baroque swirls, the clear polycarbonate (the same material Philippe Starck used when he created the famous Ghost Chair for Kartell).

But instead of one bulb, there's several lights--not unlike a birthday cake.

Alberto Meda's sleek, modern version.

Front Design's interpretation looks like a character from Alice in Wonderland.

Ludovica + Roberto Palomba turned the Bourgie into line drawing bordering on a piece of installation art.

Tokujiin Yoshioka's lamp is identical to the original Bourgie, until you see its flickering light, meant to mimic a star in the sky.

Rodolfo Dordoni took very literal inspiration from Ferruccio Laviani. His nickname for him, Ferro, is etymologically close to the word iron. Therefore, this model is built out of wrought iron.

Mario Bellini's lamp changed entirely with the color of light around it.

Piero Lissoni alludes to the architectural construction process by creating his Bourgie out of paper.

Patricia Urquiola’s Bourgie; the designer, who can masterfully repurpose materials, flipped the lamp into a rococo hanging chandelier.

14 Designers Reimagine The Classic Bourgie Lamp

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Bourgie, Kartell asked designers--like Philippe Starck, Patricia Urquiola, and Lenny Kravitz--to draft new versions of the lamp.

Contrary to its name, the Memphis design movement originated in Milan in 1980. Founded by a collective of young architects and furniture designers, the micro-movement was a rebellion against the strict modernist principles that prioritized utility above all else. Early admirers of the flamboyant trend included the late Bill Moggridge, former director of the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, and Karl Lagerfeld.

Ferruccio Laviani was also a member of the Memphis group, and the spirit of that movement is evident in his 2003 Bourgie Table Lamp designed for Kartell. A tower of baroque swirls, the clear polycarbonate lamp (the same material Philippe Starck used when he created the famous Ghost Chair) became one of Kartell’s notable designs. Now, for it’s 10th anniversary, the Italian furniture company has tasked 14 designers to cook up new versions of the Laviani original.

The outcome for Kartell Goes Bourgie is a colorful hodge-podge: Japanese studio Nendo (who just gave chopsticks a clever makeover) played with the silhouette and transparency of the original to create two lamps that click together like puzzle pieces. Starck teased out the Memphis idea of ornamentation and smothered his lamp in cheap baubles and jewelry. Most imaginative might go to Patricia Urquiola’s interpretation. The designer, who can masterfully repurpose materials, flipped the lamp into a rococo hanging chandelier.

Kartell Goes Bourgie was unveiled this week during Maison & Objet and are for sale at Kartell’s Paris flagship store.

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