If physicists and mathematicians can't be rock stars, why can't they at least have rock star logos?

No reason at all, as these 50 incredible "scientific typographics" of influential cosmologists and scientists from Pythagoras to Stephen Hawking make abundantly clear.

The scientific typographics were created by Dr. Prateek Lala, a physician and amateur calligrapher from Toronto.

Inspired by the type biographies of Indian graphic designer Kapil Bhagat, Lala designed his logos to make the lives and discoveries of various scientists more engaging and immediately relatable to students.

The typographics were for a poster that was published in the latest issue of Inside The Perimeter, the official magazine of Canada's Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics.

Co.Design

50 Rock Star Logos For Scientists

Famous scientists, from Pythagoras to Stephen Hawking, get the nerdulent logos they deserve.

If physicists and mathematicians can't be rock stars, why can't they at least have rock star logos? No reason at all, as these 50 incredible "scientific typographics" of influential cosmologists and scientists from Pythagoras to Stephen Hawking make abundantly clear.

The scientific typographics were created by Dr. Prateek Lala, a physician and amateur calligrapher from Toronto. Inspired by the type biographies of Indian graphic designer Kapil Bhagat, Lala designed his logos to make the lives and discoveries of various scientists more engaging and immediately relatable to students.

It looks like he succeeded. The typographic of Anaximander, the world's first physicist, not only references his invention of the sundial, but also looks as if it could be the logo of a pretty fantastic new video game franchise. Galileo's typographic looks like it could spring up at the start of a Discovery Channel series on astronomy; Isaac Newton's logo would look at home on the Apple proto-tablet of the same name; and Max Planck's goofy word mark has the playfulness of the opening credit sequence of a 1960s screwball comedy.

The typographics were for a poster that was published in the latest issue of Inside The Perimeter, the official magazine of Canada's Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics. You can subscribe to the magazine by email for free here.

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