Storm-chaser Mitch Dobrowner has been snapping awe-inspiring photographs of monsoons, tornados, and massive lightning storms since 2009.

His new book, Storms, with an introduction by poet Gretel Ehrlich, features 51 shots of these tempests in stunning black-and-white.

Vapor Cloud, near Clayton, New Mexico, 2009

"I see the storms as living, breathing things,” Dobrowner tells Co.Design.

“I want to get a photograph of a storm that I can hold up to the storm, and say, “What do you think?’ And the storm would be, like, ‘Okay, you got me!’” he writes.

Pillar Cloud, east of Lewistown, Montana, 2011

Road, near Guymon, Oklahoma, 2009

Rope Out, Regan, North Dakota, 2011

Chromosphere, Green Grass, South Dakota, 2012

Dragon Head, north of Berlin, North Dakota, 2011

Storms is available from Aperture for $36 here.

11 Amazing Photos Of Really Terrible Weather

Think all those snow storms on the East Coast are bad? Pshaw. Photographer Mitch Dobrowner has been chasing much nastier storms since 2009.

There’s nothing like a massive storm to make you feel like a powerless speck at the mercy of nature and its temper tantrums. The fear of thunder and lightning storms—astraphobia—is among the 10 most common phobias in the United States.

Far less prevalent is the kind of lust for extreme weather seen in storm-chaser Mitch Dobrowner, who’s been snapping awe-inspiring photographs of monsoons, tornadoes, and massive lightning storms since 2009. His new book, Storms, with an introduction by poet Gretel Ehrlich, features 51 shots of these tempests in stunning black-and-white.

"I see the storms as living, breathing things," Dobrowner tells Co.Design. "They’re born when the conditions are right, they gain strength as they grow, they fight against their environment to stay alive, they change form and mature as they age—and eventually they get old and die. Sounds familiar."

In these photographs, storms really do take on human-like character: clouds loom like smoke monsters, spasms of lightning resemble lit-up skeletons. "I want to get a photograph of a storm that I can hold up to the storm, and say, "What do you think?’ And the storm would be, like, ‘Okay, you got me!’" he writes in the book’s afterword.

Dobrowner says he’s been enthralled by storms ever since his childhood in Long Island, New York. "I have so many fond memories of being caught in thunderstorms," he says. "The rain, the lightning, and the smell. I have never have been scared of storms. I'm just fascinated by them—especially when I'm standing in front of one."

Storms is available from Aperture for $36 here.

[Photos by Mitch Dobrowner]

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3 Comments

  • I do wish FastCo would sort out the gallery; the captions overlay on the image hiding parts from view, the left, right arrows randomly disappear for me and the embedded adverts cheapen the who site. The gallery is long overdue an overhaul.

    The photos look amazing, just a shame on the viewer.

  • Sophia Pang

    I agree, could totally be improved! and the fat arrows and sudden jumping between images is jarring.

  • Jason Brashares

    I agree, I've always hated that the captions obscure part of the images. Bad design for a design blog.