At this year's Maison et Objet fair, in Paris, Tom Dixon released not one but seven new lines of accessories.

Made from brass, the Cog collection is a line of candle and tea-light holders that all mimic the shape and texture of factory-made parts.

Rather steampunk, no?

They're meant to evoke a historic era in British industrial design.

Like Dixon's retro-styled line of home accessories from last year, it's a curious collection.

The second brass line is the tabletop collection, called Arc.

It includes a trivet, a bottle opener, and a corkscrew, all built from gleaming gold-hued brass (a favorite material of Dixon's).

The designer told Dezeen, they’re "science fiction-inspired futuristic simplicity combined with practical shapes that are easy to use.”

As fantasy-driven as the new accessories may be, they all tie back into Dixon’s larger design thesis: By designing with hefty materials, and in stalwart shapes, everyday things can have major staying power.

A New Line Of Steampunk-Inspired Accessories From Tom Dixon

The all-star British designer releases his latest throwback collection, assembled from what look like old factory parts.

Last year, around this time, Tom Dixon released a retro-styled line of home accessories called Eclectic. True to the name, the curious collection was intended for "the eccentric collector’s cabinet, the modern architect’s table, and the British tearoom trolley."

Last week the British designer rolled out seven new lines of trinkets that also seem to harken back to a forgotten era. Made from brass, the Cog collection of candle and tea-light holders all mimic the shapes and textures of factory-made parts.

The tabletop collection called Arc includes a trivet, a bottle opener, and a corkscrew, all built from gleaming gold-hued brass (a favorite material of Dixon's), and looks like a fancied-up version of chemistry lab equipment. As the designer tells Dezeen, they’re "science fiction-inspired futuristic simplicity combined with practical shapes that are easy to use."

As fantasy-driven as the new accessories may be, they all tie back into Dixon’s larger design thesis: By designing with hefty materials, and in stalwart shapes, everyday things can have major staying power.

Add New Comment

0 Comments