On a Bender II

Dave Pollot is a software writer by day. By night, he turns chintzy thrift store paintings into geek-worthy collectables.

Habitat

His additions include the likes of Chewbacca, strolling through an autumn countryside.

Fall of the Empire

As well as vehicles from Star Wars, like the Tie Fighter here.

On a Bender

Pollot started these paintings because he and his girlfriend would visit thrift stores, and laugh about the idea of adding comic book heros, or sci-fi figures, onto the quaint pastoral scenes.

Intelligent Design

“The rest is history," Pollot says.

Independence Day

Pollot's work is part of a growing cadre of guerrilla artists who are repurposing the mundane by adding a layer of tongue-in-cheek pop reference.

Somewhere Over the Rainbow

Here, Pollot reprises one of his favorite additions: Bender, from Futurama.

Solo

By now, Pollot has now repurposed dozens of dusty pastoral scenes. He keeps around 20 in his basement at any given time.

Yep We're Lost

But unlike the Star Wars invasion of Thomas Kinkade’s treacly work, Pollot’s paintings aren’t menacing.

The First to Know

And whereas Banksy’s addition of a Nazi officer to an otherwise unremarkable lake scene was inherently political, Pollot’s work is a lighthearted endeavor.

Stay Puft

Need proof? Consider Pollot’s highly scientific creative process: “It's usually when I'm picking out a beer, that an idea just strikes me,” he says. “It's very much spur of the moment.”

Co.Design

AT-AT Walkers And Futurama’s Bender Sneak Into Thrift Store Paintings

Dave Pollot’s upcycled paintings are the latest in the curious fad of sci-fi characters visiting painted lakeside cottages.

“This story, as with so many others, starts with a lady,” says Dave Pollot. In Pollot’s case, the lady is his girlfriend, and the story is how he came to start painting the likes of Bender from Futurama onto chintzy paintings found at thrift stores. “On one particular visit [to a thrift store], we both poked fun at some of the more (or less I suppose) ‘interesting’ artwork that lined the floors, and we joked that it might be fun to paint funny things into them,” Pollot tells Co.Design. “The rest is history.”

Pollot, who writes software by day, has now repurposed dozens of dusty pastoral scenes and lakeside cottages by superimposing a Tie Fighter onto a quaint village, or the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man from Ghostbusters onto a hilly landscape. His work is part of a growing cadre of guerrilla artists who are turning the mundane into geek-worthy collectables by adding a layer of tongue-in-cheek pop reference.

"Fall of the Empire"

But unlike the Star Wars invasion of Thomas Kinkade’s treacly work, Pollot’s paintings aren’t menacing. And whereas Banksy’s addition of a Nazi officer to an otherwise unremarkable lake scene was inherently political, Pollot’s work is a lighthearted endeavor. Need proof? Consider Pollot’s highly scientific creative process: “It's usually when I'm picking out a beer, that an idea just strikes me,” he says. “It's very much spur of the moment.”

See more of Pollot's work here.

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