For her project Consider This Landscape a Territory, Dutch designer Roosmarijn Pallandt casts Google Earth imagery into carpet.

She creates rugs that mimic natural landscapes using only woven and knotted natural fibers and yarns.

Working with Google Earth images, she zooms in on one pixel of a bird's-eye view of a region.

She spends months researching that territory's rug-making techniques and culture and eventually turns that imagery into a one-meter-by-one-meter rug produced using the techniques of the area's local craftsmen.

The textile patterns that evoke the aerial landscapes of places like Portugal, Nepal, and Thailand are created solely through special weaving and knotting techniques.

She's currently collaborating on a new rug in Portugal and plans to expand her project to Peru, Japan, Mongolia, and parts of Africa in the future, eventually spanning all the continents.

Co.Design

Gorgeous Carpets Evoke Images From Google Earth

Designer Roosmarijn Pallandt turns aerial photography into interior decorating.

For her project Consider This Landscape a Territory, Dutch designer Roosmarijn Pallandt casts Google Earth imagery into carpet based on photographs of the places where the rugs are produced. Merging technology and geography with handicraft, she creates rugs that mimic the Earth's natural landscapes using only woven and knotted natural fibers and yarns, no dyes allowed.

Working with images snatched from Google Earth, she zooms in on one pixel of a bird's-eye view of a region. She spends months researching that territory's rug-making techniques and culture and eventually turns that imagery into a one-meter-by-one-meter rug produced using the techniques of the area's local craftsmen, who turn material like silk, yak and goat wool, eucalyptus and jute into carpets approaching artwork. The textile patterns that evoke the aerial landscapes of places like Portugal, Nepal, and Thailand are created solely through special weaving and knotting techniques. She's currently collaborating on a new rug in Portugal and plans to expand her project to Peru, Japan, Mongolia, and parts of Africa in the future, eventually spanning all the continents.

This project, she writes, "forms a direct connection between modern day Google Earth technology, local natural resources, and cultural heritage."

Feel the sands of Nepal or Thailand under your feet, without ever leaving your living room.

[H/T: The New York Times]

[Image: Courtesy of Roosmarijn Pallandt]

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