This is Lightcase, an envelope-sized portable photo studio for makers that nixes the need for tripods, professional lights, and high-end cameras.

Dominic Crenson designs tiles, and created an early version of Lightcase to get better product photography.

Lightcase has a frosted polypropylene plastic--which diffuses light, and thus avoids undesirable glares--and comes flat-packed. Thanks to some strategic creases and tabs, Lightcase can pop up into a 3-D micro studio with an infinity background.

Snag a Lightcase through Crenson's Kickstarter campaign, here.

Co.Design

This Pop-Up Photo Studio Is A Godsend For Etsy Designers

Lightcase nixes the need for tripods, professional lights, and high-end cameras, and takes seconds to construct.

You could be a genius at ceramics, or a jewelry-making savant, but without decent product photos, you're not likely to move a lot of product. Here's the rub: Hobbyists don't have easy access to professional studios, and even small photography devices can run as much as $100.

Tile designer Dominic Crinson and miniature toy designer Brenna Jenson have experienced this bind firsthand. "Product photos are crucial to successfully selling and marketing your designs," Crinson says, "but many craftspeople are making unique items, so each finished product needs to be documented. This adds to the time that goes into finishing a product, so creating one-of-a-kind items becomes less viable."

Enter Lightcase, Crinson's envelope-sized portable photo studio that nixes the need for tripods, professional lights, and high-end cameras. Once he realized how well it worked at capturing snapshots of his tiles, he showed the design to Jenson. "From there we worked with a manufacturer to develop a prototype that could support a smartphone and fold down into a small portable wallet," he tells Co.Design.

Lightcase is made of a frosted polypropylene plastic that diffuses light, a key feature because it precludes glare. The product comes flat-packed. Thanks to some strategic creases and tabs, Lightcase pops up into a 3-D micro studio the size of a hatbox, complete with an infinity background. It takes seconds to assemble. Then, in close range of bright light, you place the item you want to photograph into the Lightcase box, snap an iPhone pic, and sell away.

Snag a Lightcase through Crinson's Kickstarter campaign, here.

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