The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan by Bob Dylan. Bob, age 22, walks down Jones Street in the West Village, New York, with his girlfriend Suze Rotolo in 1963.

Though New York City’s St. Marks Place has evolved from a gutter-punk den of iniquity to a tourist trap, the sepia-tinted apartment building featured on Led Zeppelin’s 1975 album Physical Graffiti blends seamlessly into the East Village block’s current street-viewed façades.

Rock goddess PJ Harvey walks down 7th Avenue in New York City's Times Square on the cover of Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea, shot in 2000.

The Beatles' famed strut on the cover of Abbey Road in 1969. London's Westminster Council has to repaint the wall next to the crossing four times a year to cover up fans' graffiti, and the street signs are mounted extra high off the ground, because otherwise, they get stolen.

Moving Pictures by Canadian prog gods Rush, shot in front of the Ontario Legislature in Toronto in 1981.

Original Pirate Material by the Streets, featuring an image of Kestrel House in Islington, London shot by photographer Rut Blees Luxemburg.

Late for the Sky by Jackson Browne features a doctored image of a classy Hancock Park house in Los Angeles, 1974. The house was spliced with a psychedelic sky.

Eminem sits on the stoop of his childhood home on Dresden street, north Detroit, on the cover of The Marshall Mathers LP. It's just down the road from 8-Mile, the street immortalized in the 2000 film. Last year, the house was demolished after a fire.

Creedence Clearwater Revival busk outside the Duck Kee Market on Oakland's Hollis Street on the cover of Willy and the Poor Boys, 1969. Google Street View reveals the shop has been plastered over.

When the Beastie Boys shot their cover for Paul’s Boutique on the corner of Ludlow and Rivington in 1989, the neighborhood was far from the yuppified place it is today.

Pigs on the wing over Battersea Power Station in Wandsworth, London on the cover of Pink Floyd's Animals, 1977.

(What's the Story) Morning Glory by Oasis, 1995, shot on Berwick Street in London's Soho--at the time, a record shop mecca.

Classic Album Covers Mashed Up With Google Street View

Album covers set in cities around the world by the Beatles, Beastie Boys, PJ Harvey, and other famed rock acts get mashed up with Google Street View images.

In the Guardian’s latest installment of its “Cities” photo-mashup series, the all-seeing eye of Google Street View takes a tour around the locations of classic album covers shot in city streets. From The Beatles’ famed strut across Abbey Road to black-clad rock goddess PJ Harvey's trip to Times Square, the album covers are superimposed with the urban locations today, reminding us of rockstars’ power to turn an ordinary city block into hallowed ground.

The then-and-now contrast reveals how these places have or haven’t changed. Some blocks have been unrecognizably gentrified; others seem frozen in time. Though New York City’s St. Marks Place has evolved from a gutter-punk den of iniquity to a tourist trap, the sepia-tinted apartment building featured on Led Zeppelin’s 1975 album Physical Graffiti blends seamlessly into the East Village block’s current street-viewed façades. When the Beastie Boys shot their cover for Paul’s Boutique on the corner of Ludlow and Rivington in 1989, the neighborhood was far from the yuppified place it is today. It brings to mind John and Karla Murray's photo series documenting New York City’s changing storefronts (CBGB tragically turned into a John Varvatos). At least no McDonald's or Subways have cropped up in these nostalgic spots.

[h/t the Guardian]

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