Stone milling companies tend to leave a lot of material on the cutting room floor.

In the process of milling, say, a round marble tabletop, there will inevitably be a pile of scrapped stone, with roughly hewn edges, left behind afterwards.

Product designer Rachel Griffin noticed this while working on her line of modular tableware, called All of a Piece (see here).

The collection comprises several mix-and-match sections of stone and wood, that can be reconfigured any number of ways to create serving platters, cutting boards, or plates.

During the manufacturing of All of a Piece she noticed the chunks of leftover stone.

“I collected offcuts that seemed too lovely to be discarded and began searching for a way to transform them into functional objects,” says the American founder of Rotterdam-based Earnest Studio. The scraps turned into her follow up line of tableware, Fragment.

The results are two different lines of table top designs, both of which have elegant, but distinct takes on repurposing the materials at hand.

“The modularity of All of a Piece addresses the idea that objects can be mutable and reconfigurable, rather than static,” Griffin tells Co.Design. "Fragment looks at ways to repurpose waste.”

Both lines are available for purchase, and information about pricing can be had, upon request, here.

Designer Makes Gorgeous Tableware From Scrap Stone And Wood

Earnest Studio's Rachel Griffin makes the most of materials, with reconfigurable stone-and-wood collections.

Stone milling companies tend to leave a lot of material on the cutting room floor. In the process of milling, say, a round marble tabletop, a pile of scrapped stone, with rough-hewed edges, will inevitably be left behind.

Product designer and American founder of Rotterdam-based Earnest Studio, Rachel Griffin, noticed this while working on her line of modular tableware, All of a Piece. The collection comprises mix-and-match sections of stone and wood, which can be reconfigured any number of ways to create serving platters, cutting boards, or plates.

It was when Griffin visited the stone milling companies, which handled the granite pieces, she noticed the chunks of leftover stone. "I collected offcuts that seemed too lovely to be discarded and began searching for a way to transform them into functional objects," Griffin says. The scraps turned into her follow up line of tableware, Fragment.

It’s a simple enough design tweak—carving out a shallow, plate-sized basin on a piece of stone. But "we felt that it was something that had not been done before," Griffin says. The results are two different lines of table top designs, both of which have elegant, but distinct takes on re-purposing the materials at hand. "The modularity of All of a Piece addresses the idea that objects can be mutable and reconfigurable, rather than static," Griffin tells Co.Design. "Fragment looks at ways to repurpose waste."

Both lines are available for purchase, and information about pricing can be had, upon request, here.

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