Netherlands-based designer Ma’ayan Pesach combines waste products from the food industry, including bones, hair, and skin, with mass-produced objects to create a sculptural dinner set.

Called “Tribaling Mass Production,” the collection viscerally reminds us of the origins of what we eat--while we’re eating.

Long before mass-produced plastic dishware, humans made tools and utensils from animal bones, hair, and hides.

But the industrial meat industry has done away with the traditional and sustainable practice of using every part of the animal.

“My project should be seen as a criticism on the meat industry,” Pesach tells Co.Design, though she is not a vegetarian.

Some of the work is semi-practical; other pieces are purely abstract and surreal.

They resemble miniature totem poles or ritual objects.

The designer procured her materials from slaughterhouses. “I definitely saw a lot of harsh scenarios,” she says.

“But it is just a part of life, and I accept it. Did I enjoy all those moments? No. But even the less pleasant parts were very interesting."

By repurposing the leftovers of hyper-consumerism, Pesach says she aims to "raise questions about the future of eating, culture, and rituals."

Co.Design

Wild! Tableware Made From Animal Bones, Fur, And Skin

It's not your average IKEA dinner set.

Long before mass-produced plastic dishware, humans made tools and utensils from animal bones, hair, and hides. But the industrial meat industry has done away with the traditional and sustainable practice of using every part of the animal, and we’re left with disposable Solo cups clogging landfills.

Netherlands-based designer Ma’ayan Pesach wants to change that. In her graduation project at Design Academy Eindhoven, she combines waste products from the food industry--including bones, hair, and skin--with mass-produced objects, to create a sculptural dinner set. Called “Tribaling Mass Production,” the collection reminds us of the origins of what we eat--while we’re eating.

Some of the work is semi-practical; other pieces are purely abstract and surreal, resembling miniature totem poles or ritual objects. There’s a plastic ladle with a handle covered in fur; a teakettle wearing what looks a lot like a tail. “My project should be seen as a criticism on the meat industry,” Pesach tells Co.Design, though she is not a vegetarian.

The designer procured her materials from slaughterhouses. “I definitely saw a lot of harsh scenarios,” she says. “But it is just a part of life, and I accept it. Did I enjoy all those moments? No. But even the less pleasant parts were very interesting." By repurposing the leftovers of hyper-consumerism, Pesach says she aims to "raise questions about the future of eating, culture, and rituals."

These pieces reminds us of the gruesome-chic work of Victoria Ledig, Pesach’s classmate at Design Academy Eindhoven, who created a series of handbags from cows’ tails, ears, and faces. Do we spy a trend?

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5 Comments

  • Robert Grillo

    The artist thinks she is drawing attention to humanity's wasting of food but animals and their secretions are not ours to waste. That in itself is just an arrogant and anthropocentric mindset that further reinforces the dominant culture's views she claims to be opposing. Wasting is not the source of the problem; it is an outcome. Culture is the problem. Artificial breeding is the problem. Slaughterhouses are the problem.

  • Janice Martinez

    This is disgusting. For you to consider this "art" is equivalent to the Nazis considering lampshades made from human skin to be "art". These animals don't willingly go to this slaughter and for us to just accept it is contemptible. These are sentient beings wanting their lives and deserving of living their lives without humans murdering them for their body parts. You are not an artist at all.

  • Robert Grillo

    "...it is just a part of life, and I accept it" is her response to visiting slaughterhouses where she gets her materials. It's a foregone conclusion for her that slaughterhouses exist because of course it as natural and normal to eat animals as breathing. When creative minds don't question the most basic assumptions e've been conditioned for since birth or see through the spell of the culture that has conditioned us, it's quite a testament to how deeply entrenched our dominant carnistic beliefs really are. We should demand from art that it does not simply reinforce status quo thinking, in this case speciesism, but instead challenges us to question what we've been taught

  • Robert Grillo

    The popular notion that it is wrong to waste animals or animal products by not eating them is based on the presumption that their bodies and secretions are actually ours to waste, further reinforcing the anthropocentric notion that they belong to us, not them. So, based on this logic, if we discover abandoned and unfertilized turtle eggs or duck eggs or robin eggs, we are also compelled to steal them and make a meal out of them so as not to let them “go to waste.” If we look more closely at this logic, we find that the issue is not one of food wasting, but of cultural conditioning. For example, the reason we perceive only chicken eggs as edible, and don't insist on collecting the eggs of other species, is cultural conditioning. Breeding hens into existence in order to control their bodies and take the eggs that belong to them has become a socially acceptable practice, just as slavery was a socially acceptable practice throughout our history and up until just a short time ago.