Co.Design

A New Ad Campaign Is Designed To Save You In A Hurricane

With hurricane season starting June 1, a new eye-catching logo will pop up across New York City.

You know your area code, you know your ZIP code, but do you know your hurricane zone? That's a question that a new ad campaign, launching this weekend, hopes to answer for residents in New York City. The New York City Office of Emergency Management and design studio C&G Partners have collaborated on a new hurricane awareness campaign called “Know Your Zone," and it aims to help New Yorkers prepare for hurricane season, which starts on June 1.

The program targets over 3 million New Yorkers across the five boroughs and features ads on subways, bus shelters, and ferries. The primary logo, a '70s-esque bullseye, represents the six different hurricane zones in New York via brightly colored concentric circles, with the outermost circle representing the zone that is closest to the water.

“We wanted to create symbol that would attract the eye no matter where it was placed or how fast it was moving by,” Jonathan Alger, one of the designers behind the project, told Co.Design. The campaign adapts depending on where it's located: Ads on moving subways, for instance, will encourage people to find out their zone, ads on bus shelters will simply tell the viewer which zone they are currently in.

The ads prompt viewers to either call or go online to find out what zone they live in and what precautions they should take. Through the campaign’s website, you can download and print buttons that say which zone you live in.

Following the devastation of Hurricane Sandy in 2012, Alger says that the campaign’s main purpose is to educate people on preventive safety measures across many different platforms. Retweeting an ad, he says, could help save a life. Other facets of the campaign, including coffee cups, posters, and stickers will be rolled out throughout the summer.

Find out more information about the campaign here.

[Image: Post Hurricane Sandy, Queens, NY via Anton Oparin / Shutterstock]

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