As the population of baby boomers continues to age, design for the elderly is becoming increasingly valued.

Dirk Biotto created a kitchen prototype that aims to make cooking a meal easier and safer.

The kitchen features a counter that is height adjustable.

A backboard hangs easily accessible kitchen utensils.

An extendable hose allows pots to be filled from greater distances.

A sloped sink lets you easily slide heavy pots onto the counter.

The prototype is also compatible for amputees.

A grater embedded into the work surface lets you grate with one hand.

We imagine smart alterations like these will become more widespread.

Co.Design

A Kitchen Designed With Aging Baby Boomers In Mind

Industrial designer Dirk Biotto created a prototype that makes cooking easier, safer, and more accessible.

As aging baby boomers proliferate, the design community has become increasingly attuned to their needs. Take Dirk Biotto. The Berlin-based industrial designer has created a kitchen prototype that aims to make cooking a meal easier, safer, and more accessible for the elderly.

Called ChopChop, his design features a counter that is height adjustable and a backboard that hangs easily accessible kitchen utensils. An extendable hose allows pots to be filled from greater distances, so people don’t have to lug heavy pots of water across the kitchen. And if you want to fill a pot directly from the tap, a sloped sink makes it easy to slide heavy pots onto the working surface. The kitchen also takes inspiration from woodworking, and features a vise, which secures bottles and cans in place for easy opening.

Biotto was careful to ensure that his design was compatible for people who are amputees or who do not have the use of both arms. The counter fixes vegetables into place with steel bolts—for individuals who have trouble holding and cutting vegetables at the same time. And a grater embedded into the work surface lets people grate with one hand, while a drawer underneath collects the shavings. Although Biotto's design is only a prototype, we imagine that these smart alterations will become more widespread as accessible design gains traction.

See more of Dirk Biotto's work here.

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  • The only problem I see with this kitchen is that it assumes baby boomers are hyper-frugal and have not accumulated decades worth of kitchen artifacts and belongings. But as a piece of modernist interior decoration it's a pretty, if not exactly functional, solution.