Brooklyn artist Aakash Nihalani's "Landline" project is all about perspective.

From one angle, these are just two people attached to each other with a sheet of neon paper.

But from just the right angle, it appears they've been skewered with a neon bar.

The series uses electrical tape, neon paper, and magnets to hold them to the simple white t-shirts the models wear.

Nihalani has experimented with tape before, but usually as mural or wall art.

"The space around the work becomes an opportunity to experience a new reality in which the viewer can move inside or actively observe from out," Nihalani writes.

Some of the pieces involve only one person, but keep the illusion.

"Colorful bars pass through individuals, connecting them to each other and functioning as extensions of the urban landscape," Nihalani writes.

If you walk around the piece, your perspective will suddenly click at just the right angle, and you'll see the illusion.

You can check out more of Nihalani's work over at his site, Eye Scream Sunday.

Co.Design

Artist Skewers People With Neon Bars

It's all a matter of perspective.

Artist Aakash Nihalani works often with black and neon tape, crafting faux-3-D geometric shapes. His "Landline" project, a performative art piece, shows what you can do with a little tape and a little perspective.

Landline creates the illusion of people being impaled with rods, though it's less gruesome than all that. (It's done in a cartoonish style.) "Colorful bars pass through individuals, connecting them to each other and functioning as extensions of the urban landscape," Nihalani told Co.Design in an email. The illusion is crafted with nothing more than corrugated plastic, neon paper, and electrical tape. Nihalani affixes the pieces to simple white T-shirts with magnets.

From most angles, you see a strip of paper connecting two T-shirts, but when moving to just the right angle, your perspective suddenly shifts, and the strip of paper is no longer paper but a 3-D bar going through someone's chest. "The space around the work becomes an opportunity to experience a new reality in which the viewer can move inside or actively observe from out," Nihalani writes.

You can check out more of Nihalani's work over at his site, Eye Scream Sunday.

[H/T Colossal]

[Images: Courtesy of Aakash Nihalani]

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