Prominent Design School Devotes An Entire Department To Food

The Design Academy Eindhoven is hoping for a design-led "food revolution."

One of the world's most reputable design schools plans to devote an entire department to the intersection of food and design. Starting in September, Design Academy Eindhoven will allow students to pursue the whimsically dubbed "Food Non Food" specialization.

"In my field of action I am detecting a growing demand for creative minds that can focus on . . . various issues within the subject of food," department head Marije Vogelzang, a self-described "eating designer," says in a press statement. We detect it, too. Just in the past few months, designers have turned their hand to everything from redesigning chopsticks to creating iPhone-controlled home microfarming systems to personalizing food labels. The recurring thesis: Design can change how people eat, whether on an individual or a global scale.

Though the department is centered on food, cooking will not be on the syllabus, as Vogelzang explained to Dezeen:

What we will teach is bigger, more holistic and almost impossible to grasp. When I think about food I think about something much bigger than only cooking. Food is agriculture, biology, psychology, transport, human connection, animal connection, waste, health, nurture, nature, science, and also gastronomy. . . . We're still trying to define what design with food actually means and how it can contribute to the world. . . . A big group of young people [are] trying to find different ways to change the food chain and to change our perception to food. I could even say that there might be a food revolution coming up. And we need one.

The school hopes that graduates from the Food Non Food department will go on to work in restaurant, hotel, and event design, in the agricultural sector, or in packaging and label design.

[via Dezeen]

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4 Comments

  • Very exciting indeed but I too agree that it is a mistake to avoid the practicalities of food preparation all together.

    However, I do appreciate that practical preparation must be removed from some modules in order to guide the focus onto other major areas of study.

  • Very exciting indeed but I too agree that it is a mistake to avoid the practicalities of food preparation all together.

    However, I do appreciate that practical preparation must be removed from some modules in order to guide the focus onto other major areas of study.

  • Very exciting indeed but I too agree that it is a mistake to avoid the practicalities of food preparation all together.

    However, I do appreciate that practical preparation must be removed from some modules in order to guide the focus onto other major areas of study.

  • alexhargis

    As a massive food adorer, greenthumb newbie and graphics designer, my inner fat kid who loves to draw was doing the truffle shuffle when I saw this article heading. Love, love, love the impetuous and future implications for this kind of curriculum. I have to disagree about 86'ing the cooking portion. That's like an architecture program that doesn't include building construction and methods. If you don't know how to craft food to go in your pie hole, the theory and philosophy behind it become mere conversation starters and nothing else. Best of luck with the program. Are you going to be doing regular updates or publications on the program's progress? If so, please drop me a line. @ahargis