Everyone who has ever gone to school to pursue an education in the liberal arts has known at least one asshat refer to it as a "Do you want fries with that?" degree. The implication is that the degree is essentially worthless, and that it will never lead to a job where your education would be relevant.

But what about design majors? Is a Bachelor of Design degree a "French Fry" education, or does it actually lead to a job in a relevant design field?

Looking at this visualization from the United States Census Bureau showing which fields employ the highest proportion of graduates after college, it appears that design majors — along with other graduates in the visual arts — are more likely to go to work in the Arts and Entertainment fields, especially if they are men, whereas women design grads are almost equally likely to go into Education after college.

Granted, this data set is not specific to Bachelor of Design majors, but lumps in anyone with a degree in the visual and performing arts.

Still, the U.S. Census Bureau's data set does seem to suggest that getting a degree in design, as well as other visual arts, is a valuable degree for most people.

Where Do Designers Go To Work After College?

Designers and other visual arts graduates are likely to have careers in their chosen field.

Everyone who has ever gone to school to pursue an education in the liberal arts has known at least one asshat refer to it as a "Do you want fries with that?" degree. The implication is that the degree is essentially worthless, and that it will never lead to a job where your education would be relevant.

But what about design majors? Is a Bachelor of Design degree a "French Fry" education, or does it actually lead to a job in a relevant design field?

Looking at this visualization from the United States Census Bureau showing which fields employ the highest proportion of graduates after college, it appears that design majors—along with other graduates in the visual arts—are more likely to go to work in the Arts and Entertainment fields, especially if they are men, whereas women design grads are almost equally likely to go into Education after college.

Granted, this data set is not specific to Bachelor of Design majors, but lumps in anyone with a degree in the visual and performing arts. Still, the U.S. Census Bureau's data set does seem to suggest that getting a degree in design, as well as other visual arts, is a valuable degree for most people.

[Image: Student designers via Dikiiy / Shutterstock]