When he first arrived in Hong Kong four years ago, photographer Jacquet-Lagreze became fascinated with the city's architecture.

His book, Vertical Horizon, is a photographic exploration of the vertical city from below.

He takes dizzying photos of skyscrapers from the ground up.

When he first arrived in the city, he says, "I would lift up my head while walking through the buildings to look at the sky."

Jacquet-Lagreze spent six months shooting the first installment of the series, released in book form in fall 2012.

Last year, he spent three more months photographing 22 new spots in the city for a second edition of Vertical Horizon.

The photos are disorienting, and it can take a minute to recognize that the buildings are more than geometric shapes.

To capture the buildings and the sky without the blinding glare of the sun, he often arrives at the location at dawn.

"I wanted to share that feeling of looming giants surrounding me, while still being able to stare the sky," he writes.

This view, he says, gives "a deeper impression of what the city is really, expanding vertically above our head."

These Photos Of Hong Kong Skyscrapers Will Make You Very Dizzy

Photographer Romain Jacquet-Lagreze shoots cities from the ground up. 

When photographer Romain Jacquet-Lagreze first arrived in Hong Kong four years ago, he became fascinated with the city's architecture. "I would lift up my head while walking through the buildings to look at the sky," he tells Co.Design in an email. He took to photographing the city from below.

The resulting images, organized into the book Vertical Horizon, is a dizzying exercise in getting to know a city from the ground up. He shot most of the photos by looking up from the base of skyscrapers. Their vertical orientation is disorienting to the point that the buildings start to look like abstract geometric shapes.

Jacquet-Lagreze spent six months shooting the first installment of the series, released in book form in fall 2012. Last year, he spent three more months photographing 22 new spots in the city for a second edition of Vertical Horizon. To capture the buildings and the sky without the blinding glare of the sun, he often arrives at the location at dawn to shoot in the softer light.

"I wanted to share that feeling of looming giants surrounding me, while still being able to stare the sky," he writes. This view, he says, gives "a deeper impression of what the city is really, expanding vertically above our head."

Check out the second edition of Vertical Horizon here. See more of Jacquet-Lagreze's work here.  

[H/T the Telegraph]

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