The Life Of An Introvert, Illustrated

Cats. Netflix. Cancelled plans.

Introverts are often misunderstood by the more chipper and chatty members of society. Here to offer a corrective is illustrator Gemma Correll, a proud introvert, who has mapped out the heart of the introvert (likely while sitting in her Hermit’s Cave).

The many-splendored regions of the introvert’s heart include the Land of Self-Checkout Lanes (a miraculous invention, probably dreamed up by an introvert who dreaded small talk with salespeople), to which introverts travel only when their shopping can’t be done in the Tower of Online Ordering. This heart is not necessarily the strange, dark, quiet place some extroverts might assume it is: There are regions as exciting as the Isle of Netflix, the Sea of Books, and the Bay of Magazines. It’s a heart so full of animal pals, museums, and daydreams that there is simply no room for cocktail party conversations or meet and greets. It might be a heart diametrically opposed to things like cheerleading and group projects.

Infographic courtesy of Gemma Correll

You could interpret the chart as a visual distillation of Susan Cain's best-selling book, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, which champions such hibernation-prone characters. As Cain writes, "If you take a group of people and put them into a meeting, the opinions of the loudest person, or the most charismatic person, or the most assertive person are the ones that the group tends to follow." But research shows that "there’s no correlation between being the best talker and having the best ideas."

[H/T Medium]

[Photo: hawaya via Shutterstock]

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16 Comments

  • Haha! Love how there's a little map. :) ♥ I do so much of this stuff like using the self-service checkouts. Maybe I should get out there a bit more?

  • joonbug_007

    Ah, the introvert's conundrum. How do we meet the few, meaningful beings in our lives that "get it" if we can't stomach the thought of actually dealing with the wide world of regular people in the first place :)

  • Loretta Alvarado

    Oh, this is so true! After a day of selling my art at an art show all I want to do is run home and hide in Hermit's Cave. Thanks for posting this.

  • Any irony here that a few "introverts" are actually venturing out to make a comment?Love it! Challenge to author: tee up a map of "extroverts" and place adjacent to the "introvert" map. My experience has been that small creative meetings balanced with self-secure, talented people willing to defy convention in lieu of attention-getting can render innovation rather than imitation.

  • I agree only to an extent - several Jungian tests have consistently classified me as Introvert and I was convinced I was, but looking at the map, I find that few apply to me. Like interaction with salespeople, order online mostly because I am pressed for time. Love group work, but do find it straining to go to cocktail or other parties, but often find them boring. Agree that the loudest talkers don't necessarily have the best ideas. Alone Time Lake and living like a hermit would drive me nuts, although I love reading books. Do love cats. I think the whole thing is a bit more complex than the map.

  • This is so true. Love the extroverts who give themselves the merit badge for 'strong personality' Strong doesn't equal loud. Still waters......

  • Sári Gordon

    Don't forget about the introverts who disguise themselves as extroverts. Sometimes we are the loudest at meetings because our ideas are good and we want to get home as quickly as possible.

  • I'd be adrift without a cellphone connection. I love my friends and while I need ALL THE ALONE TIME, I don't mind a text or a tweet-mention to make me feel connected.

  • Leslie-Ann Drummond

    You are a kindred spirit, although my country of animal pals would take up considerably more of my map. Great illustration.

  • As an introvert, I find this illustration to be completely true and totally moving. I prefer books, movies, magazines and my puppy, but have also discovered that some social time is needed - at least weekly - to remain sane.