Forget Windows, This Private Jet Has Floor-To-Ceiling Panorama Views

What if the jet of the future just replaced windows with cameras and giant digital displays?

The views afforded by the tiny airplane window—whether it’s cloud cover, city skylines, or mountain ranges—apparently aren’t good enough for design firm Technicon. Their French office has created a concept for a private jet called the Ixion that would replace windows with floor-to-ceiling digital screens that show passengers a high-resolution panoramic livestream of their external environment inside the cabin.

According to Dezeen, the Ixion jet has solar-powered cameras on the plane’s wings and fuselage capture sky-high vistas for a dramatic visualization of the fact that you’re hurtling thousands of feet above the earth in a metal tube. If the plane’s current outside environment isn’t exciting enough for passengers, the display can be switched to display any sort of imagery—including that of a traditional plane interior, in case you’re sick of the futuristic and cutting-edge. According to the designers, removing windows makes the plane lighter, cutting fuel use and making it more energy efficient.

While the screens are a novel idea and could make for a trippy, hyperreal flight experience, the fact that the passenger is simply seeing footage of what they’re flying through instead of experiencing it first-hand, also might feel less satisfying than looking through a little porthole window at the actual sky. (Technically, you could sit on an earthbound bus with the same digital projections and pretend you were flying through the sky.) But it's still just a concept—and an ambitious one at that—so your analog window isn't going anywhere anytime soon.

[h/t Dezeen]

[Images: Technicon Design]

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4 Comments

  • Kwik Xperiment

    It's funny that most people, including the writer of this article, fail to notice that there is something fundamentally wrong with this concept. These virtual panoramas work great if your eyes have the same viewing angle and perspective as the camera used to create these images. Now imagine sitting down in one of the seats: what you'll see is a very distorted image that is hardly recognizable as something you would see through an actual transparent airplane hull.