A-frame houses had their big moment in postwar America.

The triangular structures were easy and inexpensive to build and maintain, and after architect //Andrew Geller's 1955 A-Frame Elizabeth Reese House was featured on the cover of the New York Times, the style caught on.

Soon, tens of thousands of A-frames popped up around the country, many made of plywood and two-by-sixes from simple DIY prefab kits.

In his 2004 book A-Frame, Chad Randl delves into the history of this architectural phenomenon, from the roots of the “triangle house” in prehistoric Japan to its postwar boom in the west.

Now, the full-color vintage illustrations and photographs from this book have been turned into a bright set of postcards full of nostalgia for the golden age of these ski-lodges, country homes, and vacation spots.

The package of the postcards itself, illustrated with red wood planks and windows, folds out to become its own little A-frame dwelling, big enough for, say, your pens on your desk to take a vacation inside.

The modernist dwellings were popular at many a mountain and lakeside vacation getaway, icons of a leisurely lifestyle.

Square houses were for squares.

Square houses were for squares.

Square houses were for squares.

Square houses were for squares.

Square houses were for squares.

Square houses were for squares.

A set of eight A-Frame notecards and four postcards are available for pre-order from Princeton Architectural Press for $16.95 here.

14 Vintage Pictures Of A-Frame Houses, Turned Into Postcards

These vintage illustrations make us nostalgic for the triangular house trend of postwar America.

A-frame houses had their big moment in postwar America. The triangular structures were easy and inexpensive to build and maintain, and after architect Andrew Geller's 1955 A-Frame Elizabeth Reese House was featured on the cover of the New York Times, the style caught on. Soon, tens of thousands of A-frames popped up around the country, many made of plywood and two-by-sixes from simple DIY prefab kits. The modernist dwellings were popular at many a mountain and lakeside vacation getaway, icons of a leisurely lifestyle. Square houses were for squares.

In his 2004 book A-Frame, Chad Randl delves into the history of this architectural phenomenon, from the roots of the “triangle house” in prehistoric Japan to its postwar boom in the west. Now, the full-color vintage illustrations and photographs from this book have been turned into a bright set of postcards full of nostalgia for the golden age of these ski-lodges, country homes, and vacation spots. The package of the postcards itself, illustrated with red wood planks and windows, folds out to become its own little A-frame dwelling, big enough for, say, your pens on your desk to take a vacation inside.

A set of eight A-Frame notecards and four postcards are available for pre-order from Princeton Architectural Press for $16.95 here.

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