Skip
Current Issue
This Month's Print Issue

Follow Fast Company

We’ll come to you.

1 minute read

This Sculpture Is Designed To Be Bent By Careless Mailmen

All of that rough handling by the mail service is actually what gives each sculpture a unique character.

  • <p>Post Post is a sculpture that's shaped by your mailman.</p>
  • <p>It's an aluminum sheet sculpture that's stuck into an envelope without protection.</p>
  • <p>As it's jostled during shipping, it's bent.</p>
  • <p>And those bends become its unique identity.</p>
  • <p>It's a clever way to embrace the rough handling of our mail, rather than defending against it with bubble wrap.</p>
  • <p>And it's an eye-catching piece in its own right, too.</p>
  • 01 /06

    Post Post is a sculpture that's shaped by your mailman.

  • 02 /06

    It's an aluminum sheet sculpture that's stuck into an envelope without protection.

  • 03 /06

    As it's jostled during shipping, it's bent.

  • 04 /06

    And those bends become its unique identity.

  • 05 /06

    It's a clever way to embrace the rough handling of our mail, rather than defending against it with bubble wrap.

  • 06 /06

    And it's an eye-catching piece in its own right, too.

We’ve all had things ruined in the mail, which is what led the Oslo design studio Skrekkøgle to come up with a unique idea: design a piece of art that mail delivery would improve rather than destroy.

Post Post is a flat aluminum sheet, perforated into a series of tiny triangles. As a result, it’s just a little pliable, and it will hold its shape when bent. When someone orders a Post Post, it’s slipped into a mailing bag without bubble wrap or styrofoam peanuts, and so each bump, cram, twist, and stack the package suffers on the way to their door will bend its way into the faceted sculpture that ultimately ends up in your hands, resulting in a permanent portrait of the journey.

It’s an interesting conceit on its own, but Post Post is actually a solution Skrekkøgle designed to address its own challenges running a business. Skrekkøgle’s customers were upset by products damaged in the mail, and at the same time, the company didn’t want to buy into what they call the costly "arms race" of wasteful materials used to protect goods shipped by careless delivery people.

Skrekkøgle plans on producing just 111 Post Post sculptures, which are priced at about $200 and available now, direct from Skrekkøgle.

loading