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Spin City, Never Mind the Pollocks, Line Drawing

VERY SHORT LISTSpin city   PHOTO PROJECTTheir Circular Life Their Circular Life is a beautifully designed, Flash-based photo-and-audio project that records 24-hour stretches in the life of five Italian locations.

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VERY SHORT LIST

Spin city
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PHOTO PROJECT
Their Circular Life

Their Circular Life is a beautifully designed, Flash-based photo-and-audio project that records 24-hour stretches in the life of five Italian locations.

Use the site’s onscreen speed dial to whisk through the buzz of activity at Modena’s railway station, or to check out the traffic at one of its crazier intersections. Enjoy the sound of water lapping the shore of Lago Santo, and watch an Italian park transform from daytime playground to twilight teen scene. And for those of us who won’t be making that European vacation this year, Their Circular Life presents a daylong look at Venice. Bravo!

VIEW Their Circular Life
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VSL:SCIENCE

Never mind the Pollocks
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STUDY
Pollock fractals

Ten years ago, a physicist and painter named Richard Taylor made a splash by claiming that Jackson Pollock’s “splatter paintings” contained fractals — irregular patterns repeated at multiple scales — that were so distinctive, they could be used to tell genuine Pollocks from fakes. Now it appears that Taylor was wrong.

To test Taylor’s theory, Case Western physicist Katherine Jones-Smith commissioned Pittsburgh-area painters to paint two Pollock-style drip paintings. She then searched both those paintings and three undisputed Pollock canvases for fractals. While both of the commissioned paintings contained fractals, only one of the Pollocks did. Though “well-motivated,” says Jones-Smith, Taylor’s work “doesn’t stand up under scrutiny.” And we thought the art world was rough.

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CHECK OUT the Pollock fractals
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VSL:WEB

Line drawing
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GAME
BallDroppings

Programmer-artist Josh Nimoy calls his newest invention, BallDroppings, “a musical playtoy.” We say it’s mesmerizing.

The JavaScript-based app lets you create Pong-style paddles, which deflect the tiny balls that fall from the edges of your screen. You’ll hear a ping each time a ball bounces off a line you’ve made, and if you keep enough balls in play, those pings will turn into a silly symphony. (Hint: Adjust the GRAVITY setting for an extra-trippy effect.)

PLAY BallDroppings
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