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Wanted

Our Holiday Gift Guide For The Sartorial Cyclist

We’ve written about dozens of bike accessories this year—here are seven of the coolest.

  • <p><a href="http://www.fastcodesign.com/1671282/a-theft-proof-danish-bike-light-designed-for-forgetful-cyclists#1" target="_self">The iFlash</a> works with both carbon fiber and aluminum frames, thanks to a permanent bracket system that holds each light to the bike. Bjarke Ingels’s product design company, KiBiSi, designed the lights in accordance with a new Danish law that regulates stuff like brightness and charge time, which should give you some assurance that these lights are up to snuff. Buy ‘em online <a href="http://www.iflash.dk/" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>
  • <p><a href="http://www.fastcodesign.com/1669846/a-bike-rack-that-relies-on-basic-physics-not-screws-to-stay-steady#6" target="_self">The Michelangelo</a> isn’t the most glamorous gift on this list, but it may be the most effective, according to its many fans. The two-bike stand requires zero wall mounting, instead relying on two curved legs that let the stand itself lean against any surface.</p>
  • <p>This is a genuinely well-designed object, and at <a href="http://" target="_blank"></a>, it probably won’t be a stretch budget-wise.</p>
  • <p>The controversial <a href="http://www.fastcodesign.com/1670345/kickstarting-ideos-ultra-elegant-retro-cool-electric-bike#2" target="_self">product of a collaboration between Ideo and Rock Lobster</a>, this rechargeable electric bike is the pretty, smart cousin of the more utilitarian versions you see all over the city. For the sweat-phobic commuter or heavy cargo hauler, it’s hard to find a more handsome bike.</p>
  • <p>You can pre-order the Faraday <a href="http://www.faradaybikes.com/products/faraday-porteur" target="_blank">here</a>, as long as your loved one doesn’t mind an IOU--the first bikes will ship in April 2013.</p>
  • <p>Danish cycling accessory designers Copenhagen Parts Kickstarted <a href="http://www.fastcodesign.com/1670645/finally-a-superclean-bike-light-that-attaches-with-magnets#1" target="_self">these little gems</a> earlier this year. The design eschews rubber straps and velcro for super-strong magnets, which snap directly to your frame’s seat post or bars. Take note--that means these lights only work with steel frames. They’re still accepting pre-orders on <a href="http://copenhagenparts.com/products/magnetic-bike-light" target="_blank">their website</a>, with plans for a spring launch.</p>
  • <p>The <a href="http://www.fastcodesign.com/1670580/the-h-vding-a-bike-helmet-that-inflates-like-an-air-bag-is-now-for-sale#1" target="_self">Hövding</a> inflatable helmet--which is worn around the collarbone like a cowl--sounds fantastical, but it’s been fully safety certified by the Technical Research Institute of Sweden. It’s the perfect gift for those commuters who are too proud (or too vain) to wear a normal helmet.</p>
  • <p>$600 may seem like a lot of cash, but considering the hospital bills associated with the alternative, it’s a small price to pay. Order one at their online <a href="http://shop.hovding.com/" target="_blank">shop</a>.</p>
  • <p>In the animal kingdom, there are humble animals and there are peacocks. This <a href="http://www.fastcodesign.com/1671042/a-32000-carbon-fiber-fixed-gear-bike-designed-by-a-formula-1-firm#1" target="_self">experimental carbon fiber frame</a> from the German engineers at UBC falls squarely into the latter category. At $32,500, it’s a massive investment. Compared to similar frames, you’re paying about $10,000 for every pound lost. But if you only cared about saving money, you’d be riding a Walmart fixie, right?</p>
  • <p>More on pricing and information on how to buy a Coren is <a href="http://www.ubc-coren.com/?lang=en" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>
  • <p>If you’ve got plenty of wall studs to work with, this <a href="http://www.fastcodesign.com/1665846/wanted-bike-valet-a-rack-thats-stylish-enough-for-your-pride-and-joy#5" target="_self">pretty little Bike Valet</a> is another storage option. This powder-coated steel rack looks like a Neil Denari model, or the wing of an origami crane (or both).</p>
  • <p>Kickstarted in January, more information on how to buy the $95 Valet is <a href="http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/recartfurniture/the-bike-valet-art-meet-function" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>
  • 01 /13 | KiBiSi’s Magnetic Light Set

    The iFlash works with both carbon fiber and aluminum frames, thanks to a permanent bracket system that holds each light to the bike. Bjarke Ingels’s product design company, KiBiSi, designed the lights in accordance with a new Danish law that regulates stuff like brightness and charge time, which should give you some assurance that these lights are up to snuff. Buy ‘em online here.

  • 02 /13 | Delta Cycle’s Michelangelo Two-Bike Gravity Storage Rack

    The Michelangelo isn’t the most glamorous gift on this list, but it may be the most effective, according to its many fans. The two-bike stand requires zero wall mounting, instead relying on two curved legs that let the stand itself lean against any surface.

  • 03 /13 | Delta Cycle’s Michelangelo Two-Bike Gravity Storage Rack

    This is a genuinely well-designed object, and at , it probably won’t be a stretch budget-wise.

  • 04 /13 | The Faraday Porteur

    The controversial product of a collaboration between Ideo and Rock Lobster, this rechargeable electric bike is the pretty, smart cousin of the more utilitarian versions you see all over the city. For the sweat-phobic commuter or heavy cargo hauler, it’s hard to find a more handsome bike.

  • 05 /13 | The Faraday Porteur

    You can pre-order the Faraday here, as long as your loved one doesn’t mind an IOU--the first bikes will ship in April 2013.

  • 06 /13 | The Copenhagen Parts Magnetic Light

    Danish cycling accessory designers Copenhagen Parts Kickstarted these little gems earlier this year. The design eschews rubber straps and velcro for super-strong magnets, which snap directly to your frame’s seat post or bars. Take note--that means these lights only work with steel frames. They’re still accepting pre-orders on their website, with plans for a spring launch.

  • 07 /13
  • 08 /13 | Hövding bike helmet

    The Hövding inflatable helmet--which is worn around the collarbone like a cowl--sounds fantastical, but it’s been fully safety certified by the Technical Research Institute of Sweden. It’s the perfect gift for those commuters who are too proud (or too vain) to wear a normal helmet.

  • 09 /13 | Hövding bike helmet

    $600 may seem like a lot of cash, but considering the hospital bills associated with the alternative, it’s a small price to pay. Order one at their online shop.

  • 10 /13 | UBC’s Carbon Fiber Coren

    In the animal kingdom, there are humble animals and there are peacocks. This experimental carbon fiber frame from the German engineers at UBC falls squarely into the latter category. At $32,500, it’s a massive investment. Compared to similar frames, you’re paying about $10,000 for every pound lost. But if you only cared about saving money, you’d be riding a Walmart fixie, right?

  • 11 /13 | UBC’s Carbon Fiber Coren

    More on pricing and information on how to buy a Coren is here.

  • 12 /13 | Bike Valet

    If you’ve got plenty of wall studs to work with, this pretty little Bike Valet is another storage option. This powder-coated steel rack looks like a Neil Denari model, or the wing of an origami crane (or both).

  • 13 /13 | Bike Valet

    Kickstarted in January, more information on how to buy the $95 Valet is here.

In 1917, Freud wrote about "the narcissism of small differences," unwittingly describing bike culture today. Co.Design writers covered dozens of bikes and accessories this year, from the first inflatable helmet to Ideo’s award-winning electric bike. Here are seven objects for the cyclist in your life, whether they’re into crocheted top tube pads, spandex everything, or penny farthings.

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