advertisement
advertisement

Which Dangerous Job Is Worth The Risk?

Which Dangerous Job Is Worth The Risk?
[Photo: Flickr user Tim Gage]

If you think your job is killing you, just be grateful it’s not literally killing you: in professions like fishing and logging, as many as 130 for every 100,000 workers die on the job or from job-related injuries. No job is worth dying for, of course, but at least some high-risk professions are better compensated than others. A visualization from Bloomberg breaks down which workers are paid well for their risk and which workers are getting screwed.

advertisement

Bloomberg uses an interactive scatter plot to visualize the fatality-to-pay ratio of various jobs. Fatality rates run along the X axis; pay along the Y axis. Mouse over any of the dots to reveal the job, the median income, and how many people out of 100,000 die doing it each year.

Loggers, it turns out, have it bad. In addition to being the profession with one of the highest fatality rates (97 deaths per 100,000), the industry pays poorly, with a median income of only $34,000 a year. Fishers have it really bad, only earning $35,000 a year for even more dangerous work (132 deaths per 100,000). Being an airplane pilot (commercial or private, the graphic doesn’t say) is risky, but at least you can earn a decent living: their median wages are around $100,000 with fewer fatalities than fishers or loggers (70 per 100,000).

See the full interactive graphic here

The absolute worst job in terms of risk and pay? Agricultural work. Workers only earn a median of $18,000 a year and 20 in 100,000 die every year. Not surprisingly, many of agricultural workers in the U.S. are non-citizens who have no power to push for better conditions or pay. Thrill seekers: it’s time to sign up for flight school.

[via Bloomberg]

advertisement