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  • 06.18.15

Finally, A Woman’s Face Will Be Featured On The $10 Bill

Designers take note: the Department of Treasury will be soliciting suggestions for how the new bill should look and who should be on it.

Finally, A Woman’s Face Will Be Featured On The $10 Bill

The U.S. Department of Treasury has announced that a woman will appear on the redesigned $10 bill, which will be unveiled in 2020. Who that woman will be and what the bill will look like remain to be decided, but the Treasury Department is opening it up to the public for suggestions. Designers, take note!

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The release of the new bill will coincide with the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, which granted women the right to vote. It will be the first time that a woman has been featured on American paper currency since Martha Washington appeared on the silver-dollar certificate more than a century ago.*

“America’s currency is a way for our nation to make a statement about who we are and what we stand for,” Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew said in a statement. “We have only made changes to the faces on our currency a few times since bills were first put into circulation, and I’m proud that the new 10 will be the first bill in more than a century to feature the portrait of a woman.”

Although people have been petitioning for a woman to replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 note, it’s the $10 bill that’s due for an update.

This summer, Treasury officials will be collecting input on the redesign at town hall meetings, online at thenew10treasury.gov, and on Twitter, using the hashtag #TheNew10. The final selection, which is expected to be announced by the end of the year, must embody the new bill’s theme, “democracy.” The woman, like all other figureheads on U.S. currency, must be deceased.

Got any bright design ideas? Let us know in the comments.

[via The New York Times]

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*This article has been updated to reflect that a woman hasn’t appeared on paper currency in the United States in more than a century.

About the author

Meg Miller is an associate editor at Co.Design covering art, technology, and design.

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