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  • <p>The resulting "Light Calendars" use simple lines and circles to map out the data in visually arresting ways—from using a zig-zag pattern to show the sun's height over the horizon to representing calendar months with concentric circles and days by the thickness of lines.</p>
  • <p>Courtesy of Accept & Proceed</p>
  • <p>Courtesy of Accept & Proceed</p>
  • <p>In the light calendar for 2007, 52 concentric circles represent the accumulated hours of light per week through their varying thicknesses. The lines are split into seven sections to show individual data per day.</p>
  • <p>In the calendar for 2008, 365 lines represent the days in a year. Each day is split to show where the sunrise and sunset occur. This creates a band that shows the length of daylight fluctuating over the different seasons.</p>
  • <p>Representing the total hours of light and dark in 2009, these two light calendars translate the data into a continuous wave.</p>
  • <p>Here, a blended print displays the data for astronomical twilight as well as hours of dark in 2010.</p>
  • <p>Each stroke in this linear grid represents a day, and its width is proportional to the hours of light in 2011. The angle of the sunset, known as the Azimuth, defines the orientation of each line.</p>
  • 01 /13

    These "Light Calendars" created by London-based design studio Accept & Proceed visualize the fluctuating length of daylight for each passing year.

  • 02 /13

    For the past 10 years, the designers have pulled astronomical data from timeanddate.com to populate each day's statistics.

  • 03 /13

    The resulting "Light Calendars" use simple lines and circles to map out the data in visually arresting ways—from using a zig-zag pattern to show the sun's height over the horizon to representing calendar months with concentric circles and days by the thickness of lines.

  • 04 /13

    Courtesy of Accept & Proceed

  • 05 /13

    Courtesy of Accept & Proceed

  • 06 /13

    Courtesy of Accept & Proceed

  • 07 /13

    Courtesy of Accept & Proceed

  • 08 /13

    Courtesy of Accept & Proceed

  • 09 /13

    In the light calendar for 2007, 52 concentric circles represent the accumulated hours of light per week through their varying thicknesses. The lines are split into seven sections to show individual data per day.

  • 10 /13

    In the calendar for 2008, 365 lines represent the days in a year. Each day is split to show where the sunrise and sunset occur. This creates a band that shows the length of daylight fluctuating over the different seasons.

  • 11 /13

    Representing the total hours of light and dark in 2009, these two light calendars translate the data into a continuous wave.

  • 12 /13

    Here, a blended print displays the data for astronomical twilight as well as hours of dark in 2010.

  • 13 /13

    Each stroke in this linear grid represents a day, and its width is proportional to the hours of light in 2011. The angle of the sunset, known as the Azimuth, defines the orientation of each line.

At this time of year, when the days get shorter and darkness envelops you like a warm, cozy comforter before the workday is even over, it's hard to ignore how much of our daily activity is dictated by the sun. For its annual "Light Calendars," London-based design studio Accept & Proceed visualizes the fluctuating length of daylight for each passing year with a series of stunningly detailed black and white prints. It's almost enough to make the coming winter months bearable (almost).

Though the silk-screened posters look more like Sol LeWitt prints than your average wall calendar, each is actually a highly specific depiction of the hours of light and dark throughout each year. For the past 10 years, the designers have pulled astronomical data from timeanddate.com to populate each day's statistics. The resulting "Light Calendars" use simple lines and circles to map out the data in visually arresting ways—from using a zig-zag pattern to show the sun's height over the horizon to representing calendar months with concentric circles and days by the thickness of lines.

Click through the gallery above for more information about each lovely print. Accept & Proceed's Light Calendars are currently on view at Hoxton Arches gallery in London and available for purchase for around $170 here.

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