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Exposure

This Instagrammer Is Meticulously Rebuilding Brutalist Landmarks With Lego

The lengths we go to for our love of Brutalism. And Lego.

  • <p>Arndt Schlaudraff/<a href="https://www.instagram.com/lego_tonic/" target="_blank">@lego_tonic</a></p>
  • <p>Arndt Schlaudraff/<a href="https://www.instagram.com/lego_tonic/" target="_blank">@lego_tonic</a></p>
  • <p>Arndt Schlaudraff/<a href="https://www.instagram.com/lego_tonic/" target="_blank">@lego_tonic</a></p>
  • <p>Arndt Schlaudraff/<a href="https://www.instagram.com/lego_tonic/" target="_blank">@lego_tonic</a></p>
  • <p>Arndt Schlaudraff/<a href="https://www.instagram.com/lego_tonic/" target="_blank">@lego_tonic</a></p>
  • <p>Arndt Schlaudraff/<a href="https://www.instagram.com/lego_tonic/" target="_blank">@lego_tonic</a></p>

Architects have had a decades-long affair with Lego bricks. Moshe Safdie says he bought out all of the Lego in Montreal when he was designing Habitat '67; Olafur Eliasson invited ten top architecture firms to design Lego models. Meanwhile, ravenous architecture fans can't get enough of Lego prepackaged kits of architectural masterworks, either. The annoying part is that Lego keeps a tight edit on its offerings—and retires certain kits just as fast as it brings new ones to market.

Instead of waiting for his favorite buildings to become kits, Arndt Schlaudraff took matters into his own hands—and began to spontaneously piece them together himself.

"The intention for me was to do something creative and not hang in front of my computer every evening," Schlaudraff tells Dezeen. "I tried to paint, but the results were ridiculous."

He shares snapshots of his models via @lego_tonic on Instagram. So far he's built Pritzker-winning architect Alejandro Aravena's UC Innovation Center, Mies's Barcelona Pavilion, Jurgen Sawade's Pallasseum, and the Forum Hotel in Krakow, among others. He says leans toward Brutalist and modern structures since they're blocky by nature and have silhouettes that are relatively easy to translate with Lego in comparison to the swoopy, organic lines of Zaha Hadid.

We could all take a page from Schlaudraff by turning off the Netflix binge and becoming amateur builders. Scope a few of his creations in the slide show above.

(via Dezeen)

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