Skip
Current Issue
This Month's Print Issue

Follow Fast Company

We’ll come to you.

1 minute read

Exposure

The Possessions Kurt Cobain Left Behind

L.A.-based photographer Geoff Moore was given one day with the objects, which are otherwise held in a high-security vault.

  • <p>Madonna Box, 2007</p>
  • <p>Endorsement - Cobain's Converse #1, 2007</p>
  • <p>Heart Shaped Box #1, 2007</p>
  • <p>Hi-Flier, 2007</p>
  • <p>The Tapes, 2007</p>
  • <p>The Journals, 2007</p>
  • <p>friends...in my head #1, 2007</p>
  • <p>The Promise, 2007</p>
  • <p>Nixon Now, 2007</p>
  • <p>Smashed, 2007</p>
  • 01 /10

    Madonna Box, 2007

  • 02 /10

    Endorsement - Cobain's Converse #1, 2007

  • 03 /10

    Heart Shaped Box #1, 2007

  • 04 /10

    Hi-Flier, 2007

  • 05 /10

    The Tapes, 2007

  • 06 /10

    The Journals, 2007

  • 07 /10

    friends...in my head #1, 2007

  • 08 /10

    The Promise, 2007

  • 09 /10

    Nixon Now, 2007

  • 10 /10

    Smashed, 2007

In 2007, the Estate of Kurt Cobain commissioned L.A.-based photographer Geoff Moore to photograph the Nirvana frontman's personal possessions. For one day, the objects were taken from the humidity controlled, high-security vault where they're stored to a photo studio for Moore to shoot. Initially published in Charles R. Cross’s book, Cobain Unseen, the photos are now on display at KM Fine Arts Los Angeles for the exhibition Endorsement—the unseen Cobain photos.

Smashed, 2007Geoff Moore

The 40 items Moore was given permission to shoot range from religious iconography—a broken Madonna figure, a couple of rosaries—to smashed guitars and a pile of cassette tapes. There's a black pair of converses, as well as a framed photograph of a hand strumming a guitar and one of the heart-shaped boxes the musician used to exchange with girlfriend Courtney Love. All of the objects were shot floating against a blank, white background, giving them a mythic quality.

"I mostly shoot people, so it was a bit different for me," Moore told L.A. Weekly. "It was very different to approach a project of still-lifes and bring these objects to life because, really, it's just stuff. But it's Kurt Cobain's stuff and it's just special. It's priceless. I looked at it as a director, spreading out stuff to create scenes to put together iconic moments."

Endorsement—the unseen Cobain photos is on view at KM Fine Arts until March 26.

All Photos: Geoff Moore courtesy KM Fine Arts Los Angeles

loading