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Dear Muji: Please Bring Your Tiny Houses To The U.S.

For the love of prefab, we’re begging you.

Dear Muji: Please Bring Your Tiny Houses To The U.S.
[Photo: Muji]

Dear Muji,

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You first revealed plans for tiny prefabs back in 2015, and since then I’ve been hooked. What architecture fan wouldn’t be? They’re gorgeous, they’re simple, they embody the dream of having a cozy space of one’s own far away from the grueling reality of city life. A charred-cedar-clad hut complete with a wood-burning stove, kitchenette, and floor-to-ceiling windows? Twist my arm, why don’t you.

So you can imagine that after months of keeping tabs on your plans, how bittersweet the recent news was that you’re finally bringing a prefab hut to market—but you don’t have any plans to sell them outside of Japan.

You’re a tease; I’m distraught.

[Photo: Muji]
It doesn’t matter that I don’t have the $27,000 to purchase one, that I don’t have a plot of land upon which to build it, and that the one-room hut is, as Core 77 so aptly described, basically a hard-sided 96-square-foot tent with a 33-square-foot porch. (I’d even learn how to do sun salutations to take full advantage of that outdoor space.)

There’s no running water and no electricity, and no ventilation system. It’s wildly impractical but that’s okay–Thoreau didn’t have any of that on Walden Pond either. I noticed that the kitchen disappeared, too. I could live with that. In my pipe-dream world where your hut is actually attainable, Seamless delivers.

Foolish cabin-porn dream aside, you could potentially strike it big here. We’re talking yuge deals. Yuge! Tiny houses aren’t just a lifestyle trend–cities across the country are seriously considering accessory dwelling units as a way to curb our crushing housing crisis. Los Angeles is even considering pods as a way to alleviate the homelessness crisis. Seattle, too. With a few practical tweaks–the whole plumbing, electrical, and HVAC shebang–you could make the huts viable for this purpose.

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Maybe one day you’ll figure out how your global supply chain can support international sales, or how to navigate the complexities of building codes that vary state by state and city by city. But until then, I guess I’ll have to make do with the photos you’ve so kindly provided.

Sincerely,

Your Friendly Co.Design Writer Diana

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About the author

Diana Budds is a New York–based writer covering design and the built environment.

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